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Point prevalence of neurosis in the Lundby Study 1947-1997.

Nilsson, Erik; Bogren, Mats LU ; Mattisson, Cecilia LU and Nettelbladt, Per LU (2007) In Nordic Journal of Psychiatry 61(1). p.33-39
Abstract
The objective of this article is to report and discuss the changing point prevalence rate of neurosis 1947-1997 in the Lundby cohort. The Lundby Study is a prospective longitudinal study of a geographically defined total population in the south of Sweden. Field investigations were performed in 1947, 1957, 1972 and in 1997, with psychiatrists interviewing the probands in a semi-structured way. Additional information was gathered from registers, case notes and key informants. Throughout the period of 50 years, the Lundby Study used its own diagnostic system with neurosis referring to non-psychotic mental illness in the absence of an organic brain disease. After 1957, no newcomers were included, and therefore only probands 40 years of age or... (More)
The objective of this article is to report and discuss the changing point prevalence rate of neurosis 1947-1997 in the Lundby cohort. The Lundby Study is a prospective longitudinal study of a geographically defined total population in the south of Sweden. Field investigations were performed in 1947, 1957, 1972 and in 1997, with psychiatrists interviewing the probands in a semi-structured way. Additional information was gathered from registers, case notes and key informants. Throughout the period of 50 years, the Lundby Study used its own diagnostic system with neurosis referring to non-psychotic mental illness in the absence of an organic brain disease. After 1957, no newcomers were included, and therefore only probands 40 years of age or older at the cross-sectional surveys are included in the present paper. For men aged 40-59 and 60 years or older, respectively, the age-specific point prevalence of neurosis increased from 2.5% and 0.5% in 1947, to 8.3% and 8.4% in 1972. The corresponding figures for women were 8.0% and 1.3% in 1947, and 24.2% and 20.1% in 1972. The increase could be seen in all degrees of impairment, but it was most pronounced in the mild and medium impairment groups. Except for a slight decrease in point prevalence in the female group 40-59 years of age, there were no significant changes from 1972 to 1997. A large increase in the point prevalence rate of neurosis could be seen 1947-1972, but not 1972-1997. Because of the many biases inherent in longitudinal psychiatric studies, our results must be interpreted with caution. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nordic Journal of Psychiatry
volume
61
issue
1
pages
33 - 39
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • wos:000245235400006
  • scopus:33847184560
ISSN
1502-4725
DOI
10.1080/08039480601129325
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
17341395-fde4-49a0-a333-10b384477c5a (old id 166473)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17365787&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-16 14:10:49
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:25:57
@article{17341395-fde4-49a0-a333-10b384477c5a,
  abstract     = {The objective of this article is to report and discuss the changing point prevalence rate of neurosis 1947-1997 in the Lundby cohort. The Lundby Study is a prospective longitudinal study of a geographically defined total population in the south of Sweden. Field investigations were performed in 1947, 1957, 1972 and in 1997, with psychiatrists interviewing the probands in a semi-structured way. Additional information was gathered from registers, case notes and key informants. Throughout the period of 50 years, the Lundby Study used its own diagnostic system with neurosis referring to non-psychotic mental illness in the absence of an organic brain disease. After 1957, no newcomers were included, and therefore only probands 40 years of age or older at the cross-sectional surveys are included in the present paper. For men aged 40-59 and 60 years or older, respectively, the age-specific point prevalence of neurosis increased from 2.5% and 0.5% in 1947, to 8.3% and 8.4% in 1972. The corresponding figures for women were 8.0% and 1.3% in 1947, and 24.2% and 20.1% in 1972. The increase could be seen in all degrees of impairment, but it was most pronounced in the mild and medium impairment groups. Except for a slight decrease in point prevalence in the female group 40-59 years of age, there were no significant changes from 1972 to 1997. A large increase in the point prevalence rate of neurosis could be seen 1947-1972, but not 1972-1997. Because of the many biases inherent in longitudinal psychiatric studies, our results must be interpreted with caution.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Erik and Bogren, Mats and Mattisson, Cecilia and Nettelbladt, Per},
  issn         = {1502-4725},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {33--39},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Nordic Journal of Psychiatry},
  title        = {Point prevalence of neurosis in the Lundby Study 1947-1997.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08039480601129325},
  volume       = {61},
  year         = {2007},
}