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Ovarian cancer at young age: the contribution of mismatch-repair defects in a population-based series of epithelial ovarian cancer before age 40.

Bartuma, Katarina LU ; Malander, Susanne LU ; Måsbäck, Anna LU and Nilbert, Mef LU (2007) In International Journal of Gynecological Cancer 17. p.789-793
Abstract
At least one of ten patients with ovarian cancer is estimated to develop their tumor because of heredity with the breast and ovarian cancer syndrome due to mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) being the major genetic causes. Cancer at young age is a hallmark of heredity, and ovarian cancers associated with HNPCC have been demonstrated to develop at a particularly early age. We used the Swedish Cancer Registry to identify a population-based series of 98 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers that developed before 40 years. Mucinous and endometrioid cancers were overrepresented and were diagnosed in 27% and 16% of the tumors, respectively. Immunostaining using antibodies against MLH1,... (More)
At least one of ten patients with ovarian cancer is estimated to develop their tumor because of heredity with the breast and ovarian cancer syndrome due to mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) being the major genetic causes. Cancer at young age is a hallmark of heredity, and ovarian cancers associated with HNPCC have been demonstrated to develop at a particularly early age. We used the Swedish Cancer Registry to identify a population-based series of 98 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers that developed before 40 years. Mucinous and endometrioid cancers were overrepresented and were diagnosed in 27% and 16% of the tumors, respectively. Immunostaining using antibodies against MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6 was used to assess the mismatch-repair status and revealed loss of expression of MLH1/PMS2 in two cases, loss of MSH2/MSH6 in one case, and loss of MSH6 only in three tumors. A microsatellite instability–high phenotype was verified in five of six tumors. Based on the identified mutations and family history of cancer, several of these individuals are likely to be affected by HNPCC. We conclude that although the causes of the vast majority of epithelial ovarian cancer at young age are unknown, HNPCC should be considered because of the high risk of metachronous colorectal cancer in the individual and the possibility of preventing additional cancers in the family through control programs. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Gynecological Cancer
volume
17
pages
789 - 793
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000248302900006
  • scopus:34447314503
ISSN
1048-891X
DOI
10.1111/j.1525-1438.2007.00875.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6b11634c-1497-4b89-a943-349a86bbfa59 (old id 166769)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17343610&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-23 08:27:51
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:12:53
@article{6b11634c-1497-4b89-a943-349a86bbfa59,
  abstract     = {At least one of ten patients with ovarian cancer is estimated to develop their tumor because of heredity with the breast and ovarian cancer syndrome due to mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) being the major genetic causes. Cancer at young age is a hallmark of heredity, and ovarian cancers associated with HNPCC have been demonstrated to develop at a particularly early age. We used the Swedish Cancer Registry to identify a population-based series of 98 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers that developed before 40 years. Mucinous and endometrioid cancers were overrepresented and were diagnosed in 27% and 16% of the tumors, respectively. Immunostaining using antibodies against MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6 was used to assess the mismatch-repair status and revealed loss of expression of MLH1/PMS2 in two cases, loss of MSH2/MSH6 in one case, and loss of MSH6 only in three tumors. A microsatellite instability–high phenotype was verified in five of six tumors. Based on the identified mutations and family history of cancer, several of these individuals are likely to be affected by HNPCC. We conclude that although the causes of the vast majority of epithelial ovarian cancer at young age are unknown, HNPCC should be considered because of the high risk of metachronous colorectal cancer in the individual and the possibility of preventing additional cancers in the family through control programs.},
  author       = {Bartuma, Katarina and Malander, Susanne and Måsbäck, Anna and Nilbert, Mef},
  issn         = {1048-891X},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {789--793},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {International Journal of Gynecological Cancer},
  title        = {Ovarian cancer at young age: the contribution of mismatch-repair defects in a population-based series of epithelial ovarian cancer before age 40.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1525-1438.2007.00875.x},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2007},
}