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Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system

Arneth, Almut LU ; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K.; Menon, S.; Bartlein, P. J.; Feichter, J.; Korhola, A.; Kulmala, M. and O'Donnell, D., et al. (2010) In Nature Geoscience 3(8). p.525-532
Abstract
The terrestrial biosphere is a key regulator of atmospheric chemistry and climate. During past periods of climate change, vegetation cover and interactions between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere changed within decades. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemistry to anthropogenically forced climate change and air pollution. Although interactions between the carbon cycle and climate have been a central focus, other biogeochemical feedbacks could be as important in modulating future climate change. Total positive radiative forcings resulting from feedbacks between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere are estimated to reach up to 0.9 or 1.5 W m(-2) K-1 towards the end of the twenty-first... (More)
The terrestrial biosphere is a key regulator of atmospheric chemistry and climate. During past periods of climate change, vegetation cover and interactions between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere changed within decades. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemistry to anthropogenically forced climate change and air pollution. Although interactions between the carbon cycle and climate have been a central focus, other biogeochemical feedbacks could be as important in modulating future climate change. Total positive radiative forcings resulting from feedbacks between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere are estimated to reach up to 0.9 or 1.5 W m(-2) K-1 towards the end of the twenty-first century, depending on the extent to which interactions with the nitrogen cycle stimulate or limit carbon sequestration. This substantially reduces and potentially even eliminates the cooling effect owing to carbon dioxide fertilization of the terrestrial biota. The overall magnitude of the biogeochemical feedbacks could potentially be similar to that of feedbacks in the physical climate system, but there are large uncertainties in the magnitude of individual estimates and in accounting for synergies between these effects. (Less)
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Nature Geoscience
volume
3
issue
8
pages
525 - 532
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000281467500010
  • scopus:77955220983
ISSN
1752-0908
DOI
10.1038/ngeo905
project
MERGE
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a39cdabb-8749-45af-adba-56f5295552e7 (old id 1672312)
date added to LUP
2010-09-23 14:53:21
date last changed
2018-07-01 03:01:01
@article{a39cdabb-8749-45af-adba-56f5295552e7,
  abstract     = {The terrestrial biosphere is a key regulator of atmospheric chemistry and climate. During past periods of climate change, vegetation cover and interactions between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere changed within decades. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemistry to anthropogenically forced climate change and air pollution. Although interactions between the carbon cycle and climate have been a central focus, other biogeochemical feedbacks could be as important in modulating future climate change. Total positive radiative forcings resulting from feedbacks between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere are estimated to reach up to 0.9 or 1.5 W m(-2) K-1 towards the end of the twenty-first century, depending on the extent to which interactions with the nitrogen cycle stimulate or limit carbon sequestration. This substantially reduces and potentially even eliminates the cooling effect owing to carbon dioxide fertilization of the terrestrial biota. The overall magnitude of the biogeochemical feedbacks could potentially be similar to that of feedbacks in the physical climate system, but there are large uncertainties in the magnitude of individual estimates and in accounting for synergies between these effects.},
  author       = {Arneth, Almut and Harrison, S. P. and Zaehle, S. and Tsigaridis, K. and Menon, S. and Bartlein, P. J. and Feichter, J. and Korhola, A. and Kulmala, M. and O'Donnell, D. and Schurgers, Guy and Sorvari, S. and Vesala, T.},
  issn         = {1752-0908},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {525--532},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Nature Geoscience},
  title        = {Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ngeo905},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2010},
}