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Growth hormone, prolactin and cortisol response to exercise in patients with depression

Krogh, Jesper; Nordentoft, Merete; Mohammad-Nezhad, Mandi and Westrin, Åsa LU (2010) In Journal of Affective Disorders 125(1-3). p.189-197
Abstract
Background: A blunted growth hormone and prolactin response to pharmacological stress test have previously been found in depressed patients, as well as an increased cortisol response to psychosocial stress. This study investigated these hormones in response to acute exercise using an incremental bicycle test. Method: A cross-sectional comparison of cortisol, growth hormone, and prolactin in depressed (n = 137) and healthy (n = 44) subjects during rest and in response to an incremental bicycle test. Secondly, we tested the depressed patients again after a 4-month randomized naturalistic exercise intervention. Results: Resting plasma levels of growth hormone (GH), cortisol, or prolactin (PRL) did not differ between depressed and healthy... (More)
Background: A blunted growth hormone and prolactin response to pharmacological stress test have previously been found in depressed patients, as well as an increased cortisol response to psychosocial stress. This study investigated these hormones in response to acute exercise using an incremental bicycle test. Method: A cross-sectional comparison of cortisol, growth hormone, and prolactin in depressed (n = 137) and healthy (n = 44) subjects during rest and in response to an incremental bicycle test. Secondly, we tested the depressed patients again after a 4-month randomized naturalistic exercise intervention. Results: Resting plasma levels of growth hormone (GH), cortisol, or prolactin (PRL) did not differ between depressed and healthy subjects (all p-values > .12). In response to an incremental bicycle test the GH (p = .02) and cortisol (p = .05) response in depressed was different compared to healthy controls. The effect of acute exercise stress on PRL (p = .56) did not differ between depressed and healthy subjects. Apart from a decrease in CH response in the strength-training group (p = .03) the pragmatic exercise intervention did not affect resting hormonal levels, or the response to acute exercise. Conclusions: Patients with mild to moderate depression had a different growth hormone and cortisol response to acute exercise stress compared to healthy controls. Strength training was able to reduce the growth hormone response to acute exercise stress in this patient population. Studies with more rigorous inclusion criteria and higher exercise frequencies are needed to evaluate and confirm the possible effect of exercise in depressed subjects. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
clinical trial, Prolactin randomized, Cortisol, Growth hormone, Depression, Exercise
in
Journal of Affective Disorders
volume
125
issue
1-3
pages
189 - 197
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000281377100026
  • scopus:77955560726
ISSN
1573-2517
DOI
10.1016/j.jad.2010.01.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a56be0fe-e804-4571-9df0-ba35409eaa8f (old id 1672374)
date added to LUP
2010-09-23 14:15:50
date last changed
2018-07-01 03:09:21
@article{a56be0fe-e804-4571-9df0-ba35409eaa8f,
  abstract     = {Background: A blunted growth hormone and prolactin response to pharmacological stress test have previously been found in depressed patients, as well as an increased cortisol response to psychosocial stress. This study investigated these hormones in response to acute exercise using an incremental bicycle test. Method: A cross-sectional comparison of cortisol, growth hormone, and prolactin in depressed (n = 137) and healthy (n = 44) subjects during rest and in response to an incremental bicycle test. Secondly, we tested the depressed patients again after a 4-month randomized naturalistic exercise intervention. Results: Resting plasma levels of growth hormone (GH), cortisol, or prolactin (PRL) did not differ between depressed and healthy subjects (all p-values > .12). In response to an incremental bicycle test the GH (p = .02) and cortisol (p = .05) response in depressed was different compared to healthy controls. The effect of acute exercise stress on PRL (p = .56) did not differ between depressed and healthy subjects. Apart from a decrease in CH response in the strength-training group (p = .03) the pragmatic exercise intervention did not affect resting hormonal levels, or the response to acute exercise. Conclusions: Patients with mild to moderate depression had a different growth hormone and cortisol response to acute exercise stress compared to healthy controls. Strength training was able to reduce the growth hormone response to acute exercise stress in this patient population. Studies with more rigorous inclusion criteria and higher exercise frequencies are needed to evaluate and confirm the possible effect of exercise in depressed subjects. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Krogh, Jesper and Nordentoft, Merete and Mohammad-Nezhad, Mandi and Westrin, Åsa},
  issn         = {1573-2517},
  keyword      = {clinical trial,Prolactin randomized,Cortisol,Growth hormone,Depression,Exercise},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-3},
  pages        = {189--197},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Affective Disorders},
  title        = {Growth hormone, prolactin and cortisol response to exercise in patients with depression},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2010.01.009},
  volume       = {125},
  year         = {2010},
}