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Hemodynamic effects of vacuum-assisted closure therapy in cardiac surgery: assessment using magnetic resonance imaging.

Petzina, Rainer LU ; Ugander, Martin LU ; Gustafsson, Lotta LU ; Engblom, Henrik LU ; Sjögren, Johan LU ; Hetzer, Roland; Ingemansson, Richard LU ; Arheden, Håkan LU and Malmsjö, Malin LU (2007) In Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 133(5). p.1154-1162
Abstract
Objective: The hemodynamic effects of vacuum-assisted closure therapy in cardiac surgery are debated. The aim of the present study was to quantify cardiac output and left ventricular chamber volumes after vacuum-assisted closure using magnetic resonance imaging, which is known to be the most accurate method for quantifying these measures. Methods: Six pigs had median sternotomy followed by vacuum-assisted closure treatment in the presence and absence of a paraffin gauze interface dressing. Cardiac output and stroke volume were examined using magnetic resonance imaging flow quantification (breath-hold and real-time). Chamber volumes were assessed using cine magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Cardiac output and stroke volume decreased... (More)
Objective: The hemodynamic effects of vacuum-assisted closure therapy in cardiac surgery are debated. The aim of the present study was to quantify cardiac output and left ventricular chamber volumes after vacuum-assisted closure using magnetic resonance imaging, which is known to be the most accurate method for quantifying these measures. Methods: Six pigs had median sternotomy followed by vacuum-assisted closure treatment in the presence and absence of a paraffin gauze interface dressing. Cardiac output and stroke volume were examined using magnetic resonance imaging flow quantification (breath-hold and real-time). Chamber volumes were assessed using cine magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Cardiac output and stroke volume decreased immediately after application of negative pressures of 75, 125, and 175 mm Hg (13% +/- 1% decrease in cardiac output). Interposition of 4 layers of paraffin gauze dressing over the heart during vacuum-assisted closure therapy resulted in a smaller decrease in cardiac output (8% +/- 1%). Conclusions: Vacuum-assisted closure therapy results in an immediate decrease in cardiac output, although to a lesser extent than shown previously. Covering the heart with a wound interface dressing lessens the hemodynamic effects of vacuum-assisted closure. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
volume
133
issue
5
pages
1154 - 1162
publisher
Mosby
external identifiers
  • wos:000246062300006
  • scopus:34247397384
ISSN
1097-685X
DOI
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2007.01.011
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d71bb546-780f-4c13-a606-acd14d5f2271 (old id 167301)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17467423&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-04 10:42:11
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:37:46
@article{d71bb546-780f-4c13-a606-acd14d5f2271,
  abstract     = {Objective: The hemodynamic effects of vacuum-assisted closure therapy in cardiac surgery are debated. The aim of the present study was to quantify cardiac output and left ventricular chamber volumes after vacuum-assisted closure using magnetic resonance imaging, which is known to be the most accurate method for quantifying these measures. Methods: Six pigs had median sternotomy followed by vacuum-assisted closure treatment in the presence and absence of a paraffin gauze interface dressing. Cardiac output and stroke volume were examined using magnetic resonance imaging flow quantification (breath-hold and real-time). Chamber volumes were assessed using cine magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Cardiac output and stroke volume decreased immediately after application of negative pressures of 75, 125, and 175 mm Hg (13% +/- 1% decrease in cardiac output). Interposition of 4 layers of paraffin gauze dressing over the heart during vacuum-assisted closure therapy resulted in a smaller decrease in cardiac output (8% +/- 1%). Conclusions: Vacuum-assisted closure therapy results in an immediate decrease in cardiac output, although to a lesser extent than shown previously. Covering the heart with a wound interface dressing lessens the hemodynamic effects of vacuum-assisted closure.},
  author       = {Petzina, Rainer and Ugander, Martin and Gustafsson, Lotta and Engblom, Henrik and Sjögren, Johan and Hetzer, Roland and Ingemansson, Richard and Arheden, Håkan and Malmsjö, Malin},
  issn         = {1097-685X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1154--1162},
  publisher    = {Mosby},
  series       = {Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery},
  title        = {Hemodynamic effects of vacuum-assisted closure therapy in cardiac surgery: assessment using magnetic resonance imaging.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcvs.2007.01.011},
  volume       = {133},
  year         = {2007},
}