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Possibility of Mixed Progenitor Cells in Sea Star Arm Regeneration

Hernroth, Bodil; Farahani, Farhad; Brunborg, Gunnar; Dupont, Sam; Dejmek, Annika LU and Skold, Helen Nilsson (2010) In Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution 314B(6). p.457-468
Abstract
In contrast to most vertebrates, invertebrate deuterostome echinoderms, such as the sea star Asterias rubens, undergo regeneration of lost body parts. The current hypothesis suggests that differentiated cells are the main source for regenerating arm in sea stars, but there is little information regarding the origin and identity of these cells. Here, we show that several organs distant to the regenerating arm responded by proliferation, most significantly in the coelomic epithelium and larger cells of the pyloric caeca. Analyzing markers for proliferating cells and parameters indicating cell ageing, such as levels of DNA damage, pigment, and lipofuscin contents as well as telomere length and telomerase activity, we suggest that cells... (More)
In contrast to most vertebrates, invertebrate deuterostome echinoderms, such as the sea star Asterias rubens, undergo regeneration of lost body parts. The current hypothesis suggests that differentiated cells are the main source for regenerating arm in sea stars, but there is little information regarding the origin and identity of these cells. Here, we show that several organs distant to the regenerating arm responded by proliferation, most significantly in the coelomic epithelium and larger cells of the pyloric caeca. Analyzing markers for proliferating cells and parameters indicating cell ageing, such as levels of DNA damage, pigment, and lipofuscin contents as well as telomere length and telomerase activity, we suggest that cells contributing to the new arm likely originate from progenitors rather than differentiated cells. This is the first study showing that cells of mixed origin may be recruited from more distant sources of stem/progenitor cells in a sea star, and the first described indication of a role for pyloric caeca in arm regeneration. Data on growth rate during arm regeneration further indicate that regeneration is at the expense of whole animal growth. We propose a new working hypothesis for arm regeneration in sea stars involving four phases: wound healing by coelomocytes, migration of distant progenitor cells of mixed origin including from pyloric caeca, proliferation in these organs to compensate for cell loss, and finally, local proliferation in the regenerating arm J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 3148:457-468, 2010. (C) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution
volume
314B
issue
6
pages
457 - 468
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000281088100004
  • scopus:77955669132
ISSN
1552-5007
DOI
10.1002/jez.b.21352
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
60af41b4-7f7a-4a7c-9f39-ca361c52f208 (old id 1673082)
date added to LUP
2010-09-23 12:45:58
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:48:04
@article{60af41b4-7f7a-4a7c-9f39-ca361c52f208,
  abstract     = {In contrast to most vertebrates, invertebrate deuterostome echinoderms, such as the sea star Asterias rubens, undergo regeneration of lost body parts. The current hypothesis suggests that differentiated cells are the main source for regenerating arm in sea stars, but there is little information regarding the origin and identity of these cells. Here, we show that several organs distant to the regenerating arm responded by proliferation, most significantly in the coelomic epithelium and larger cells of the pyloric caeca. Analyzing markers for proliferating cells and parameters indicating cell ageing, such as levels of DNA damage, pigment, and lipofuscin contents as well as telomere length and telomerase activity, we suggest that cells contributing to the new arm likely originate from progenitors rather than differentiated cells. This is the first study showing that cells of mixed origin may be recruited from more distant sources of stem/progenitor cells in a sea star, and the first described indication of a role for pyloric caeca in arm regeneration. Data on growth rate during arm regeneration further indicate that regeneration is at the expense of whole animal growth. We propose a new working hypothesis for arm regeneration in sea stars involving four phases: wound healing by coelomocytes, migration of distant progenitor cells of mixed origin including from pyloric caeca, proliferation in these organs to compensate for cell loss, and finally, local proliferation in the regenerating arm J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 3148:457-468, 2010. (C) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.},
  author       = {Hernroth, Bodil and Farahani, Farhad and Brunborg, Gunnar and Dupont, Sam and Dejmek, Annika and Skold, Helen Nilsson},
  issn         = {1552-5007},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {457--468},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution},
  title        = {Possibility of Mixed Progenitor Cells in Sea Star Arm Regeneration},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jez.b.21352},
  volume       = {314B},
  year         = {2010},
}