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Smoking, healthcare cost, and loss of productivity in Sweden 2001

Bolin, Kristian LU and Lindgren, Björn LU (2007) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 35(2). p.187-196
Abstract
Aims: Objectives were (a) to estimate healthcare cost and productivity losses due to smoking in Sweden 2001 and (b) to compare the results with studies for Sweden 1980, Canada 1991, Germany 1996, and the USA 1998. Methods: Published estimates on relative risks and Swedish smoking patterns were used to calculate attributable risks for smokers and former smokers. These were applied to cost estimates for smoking-related diseases based on data from public Swedish registers. Results: The estimated total cost for Sweden 2001 was US$ 804 million; COPD and cancer of the lung accounted for 43%. Healthcare cost accounted for 26% of the total cost. The estimated costs per smoker were US$ 3,200 in the USA 1998; 1,600 in Canada 1991; 1,100 in Germany... (More)
Aims: Objectives were (a) to estimate healthcare cost and productivity losses due to smoking in Sweden 2001 and (b) to compare the results with studies for Sweden 1980, Canada 1991, Germany 1996, and the USA 1998. Methods: Published estimates on relative risks and Swedish smoking patterns were used to calculate attributable risks for smokers and former smokers. These were applied to cost estimates for smoking-related diseases based on data from public Swedish registers. Results: The estimated total cost for Sweden 2001 was US$ 804 million; COPD and cancer of the lung accounted for 43%. Healthcare cost accounted for 26% of the total cost. The estimated costs per smoker were US$ 3,200 in the USA 1998; 1,600 in Canada 1991; 1,100 in Germany 1996; 600 in Sweden 2001; and 300 in Sweden 1980 (all in 2001 US$ prices). Conclusions: To reduce the prevalence of smoking is an issue worthwhile pursuing in its own right. In order to reduce the cost of smoking, however, policy-makers should also explore and influence the factors that determine the cost per smoker. Sweden seems to have been more successful than comparable countries in pursuing both these objectives. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Health Care Costs, Germany: epidemiology, Female, Efficiency, Canada: epidemiology, 80 and over, Middle Aged, Male, Health: economics, Aged, Adult, Mortality, Morbidity, Registries, Risk Factors, Insurance, Humans, Smoking: adverse effects, Sick Leave, Smoking: economics, Sweden: epidemiology, United States: epidemiology
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
35
issue
2
pages
187 - 196
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000245641500011
  • scopus:34147111413
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1080/14034940600858557
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
93e3de18-d893-46cd-8b7c-60b45f10b4bf (old id 167394)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=17454923&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-12 09:11:57
date last changed
2017-09-24 04:18:14
@article{93e3de18-d893-46cd-8b7c-60b45f10b4bf,
  abstract     = {Aims: Objectives were (a) to estimate healthcare cost and productivity losses due to smoking in Sweden 2001 and (b) to compare the results with studies for Sweden 1980, Canada 1991, Germany 1996, and the USA 1998. Methods: Published estimates on relative risks and Swedish smoking patterns were used to calculate attributable risks for smokers and former smokers. These were applied to cost estimates for smoking-related diseases based on data from public Swedish registers. Results: The estimated total cost for Sweden 2001 was US$ 804 million; COPD and cancer of the lung accounted for 43%. Healthcare cost accounted for 26% of the total cost. The estimated costs per smoker were US$ 3,200 in the USA 1998; 1,600 in Canada 1991; 1,100 in Germany 1996; 600 in Sweden 2001; and 300 in Sweden 1980 (all in 2001 US$ prices). Conclusions: To reduce the prevalence of smoking is an issue worthwhile pursuing in its own right. In order to reduce the cost of smoking, however, policy-makers should also explore and influence the factors that determine the cost per smoker. Sweden seems to have been more successful than comparable countries in pursuing both these objectives.},
  author       = {Bolin, Kristian and Lindgren, Björn},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  keyword      = {Health Care Costs,Germany: epidemiology,Female,Efficiency,Canada: epidemiology,80 and over,Middle Aged,Male,Health: economics,Aged,Adult,Mortality,Morbidity,Registries,Risk Factors,Insurance,Humans,Smoking: adverse effects,Sick Leave,Smoking: economics,Sweden: epidemiology,United States: epidemiology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {187--196},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Smoking, healthcare cost, and loss of productivity in Sweden 2001},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14034940600858557},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2007},
}