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What a hawkmoth remembers after hibernation depends on innate preferences and conditioning situation

Kelber, Almut LU (2010) In Behavioral Ecology 21(5). p.1093-1097
Abstract
Nectar-feeding insects find flowers by 2 means, innate preferences and learned associations. When insects that hibernate as imagos (i.e., adults) start foraging after a long winter break, what guides them to new nectar rewards? Are innate preferences kept over such a long period? And are learned associations useful after long breaks? In a series of experiments I show here that, depending on previous experience, the European hummingbird hawkmoth, Macroglossum stellatarum can use both types of information to choose a first flower after periods of 1 or 3 weeks. What is remembered seems to depend on innate preferences of the moths. Moths trained to feed from 1 of 2 colors that are equally attractive to naive moths keep the learned preference.... (More)
Nectar-feeding insects find flowers by 2 means, innate preferences and learned associations. When insects that hibernate as imagos (i.e., adults) start foraging after a long winter break, what guides them to new nectar rewards? Are innate preferences kept over such a long period? And are learned associations useful after long breaks? In a series of experiments I show here that, depending on previous experience, the European hummingbird hawkmoth, Macroglossum stellatarum can use both types of information to choose a first flower after periods of 1 or 3 weeks. What is remembered seems to depend on innate preferences of the moths. Moths trained to feed from 1 of 2 colors that are equally attractive to naive moths keep the learned preference. Animals trained to prefer a less attractive color to an innately preferred color loose the learned preference and return to the innate choice behavior. I conclude that hummingbird hawkmoths can keep innate and learned preferences over a long period and are able to use both types of information when searching nectar rewards after long periods of hibernation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
stellatarum, Macroglossum, long-term memory, Lepidoptera, hummingbird hawkmoth, hibernation, hawkmoth, insects, color learning, innate preferences
in
Behavioral Ecology
volume
21
issue
5
pages
1093 - 1097
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000280903900031
  • scopus:77955911564
ISSN
1045-2249
DOI
10.1093/beheco/arq115
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
933fe9b6-ea22-4c59-8059-987227e55436 (old id 1677107)
date added to LUP
2010-09-21 15:57:53
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:38:17
@article{933fe9b6-ea22-4c59-8059-987227e55436,
  abstract     = {Nectar-feeding insects find flowers by 2 means, innate preferences and learned associations. When insects that hibernate as imagos (i.e., adults) start foraging after a long winter break, what guides them to new nectar rewards? Are innate preferences kept over such a long period? And are learned associations useful after long breaks? In a series of experiments I show here that, depending on previous experience, the European hummingbird hawkmoth, Macroglossum stellatarum can use both types of information to choose a first flower after periods of 1 or 3 weeks. What is remembered seems to depend on innate preferences of the moths. Moths trained to feed from 1 of 2 colors that are equally attractive to naive moths keep the learned preference. Animals trained to prefer a less attractive color to an innately preferred color loose the learned preference and return to the innate choice behavior. I conclude that hummingbird hawkmoths can keep innate and learned preferences over a long period and are able to use both types of information when searching nectar rewards after long periods of hibernation.},
  author       = {Kelber, Almut},
  issn         = {1045-2249},
  keyword      = {stellatarum,Macroglossum,long-term memory,Lepidoptera,hummingbird hawkmoth,hibernation,hawkmoth,insects,color learning,innate preferences},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1093--1097},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Behavioral Ecology},
  title        = {What a hawkmoth remembers after hibernation depends on innate preferences and conditioning situation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arq115},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2010},
}