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Anomalous celestial polarization caused by forest fire smoke: why do some insects become visually disoriented under smoky skies?

Hegedus, R; Åkesson, Susanne LU and Horvath, G (2007) In Applied Optics 46(14). p.2717-2726
Abstract
The effects of forest fire smoke on sky polarization and animal orientation are practically unknown. Using full-sky imaging polarimetry, we therefore measured the celestial polarization pattern under a smoky sky in Fairbanks, Alaska, during the forest fire season in August 2005. It is quantitatively documented here that the celestial polarization, a sky attribute that is necessary for orientation of many polarization-sensitive animal species, above Fairbanks on 17 August 2005 was in several aspects anomalous due to the forest fire smoke: (i) The pattern of the degree of linear polarization p of the reddish smoky sky differed considerably from that of the corresponding clear blue sky. (ii) Due to the smoke, p of skylight was drastically... (More)
The effects of forest fire smoke on sky polarization and animal orientation are practically unknown. Using full-sky imaging polarimetry, we therefore measured the celestial polarization pattern under a smoky sky in Fairbanks, Alaska, during the forest fire season in August 2005. It is quantitatively documented here that the celestial polarization, a sky attribute that is necessary for orientation of many polarization-sensitive animal species, above Fairbanks on 17 August 2005 was in several aspects anomalous due to the forest fire smoke: (i) The pattern of the degree of linear polarization p of the reddish smoky sky differed considerably from that of the corresponding clear blue sky. (ii) Due to the smoke, p of skylight was drastically reduced (p(max) <= 14%, p(average) <= 8%). (iii) Depending on wavelength and time, the Arago, Babinet, and Brewster neutral points of sky polarization had anomalous positions. We suggest that the disorientation of certain insects observed by Canadian researchers under smoky skies during the forest fire season in August 2003 in British Columbia was the consequence of the anomalous sky polarization caused by the forest fire smoke. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Applied Optics
volume
46
issue
14
pages
2717 - 2726
publisher
OSA
external identifiers
  • wos:000246237900020
  • scopus:34250782183
ISSN
2155-3165
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b9481fc7-5f6a-4424-80eb-3dcfc547a8b2 (old id 168640)
alternative location
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-46-14-2717
date added to LUP
2007-06-26 08:14:47
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:31:21
@article{b9481fc7-5f6a-4424-80eb-3dcfc547a8b2,
  abstract     = {The effects of forest fire smoke on sky polarization and animal orientation are practically unknown. Using full-sky imaging polarimetry, we therefore measured the celestial polarization pattern under a smoky sky in Fairbanks, Alaska, during the forest fire season in August 2005. It is quantitatively documented here that the celestial polarization, a sky attribute that is necessary for orientation of many polarization-sensitive animal species, above Fairbanks on 17 August 2005 was in several aspects anomalous due to the forest fire smoke: (i) The pattern of the degree of linear polarization p of the reddish smoky sky differed considerably from that of the corresponding clear blue sky. (ii) Due to the smoke, p of skylight was drastically reduced (p(max) &lt;= 14%, p(average) &lt;= 8%). (iii) Depending on wavelength and time, the Arago, Babinet, and Brewster neutral points of sky polarization had anomalous positions. We suggest that the disorientation of certain insects observed by Canadian researchers under smoky skies during the forest fire season in August 2003 in British Columbia was the consequence of the anomalous sky polarization caused by the forest fire smoke.},
  author       = {Hegedus, R and Åkesson, Susanne and Horvath, G},
  issn         = {2155-3165},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {14},
  pages        = {2717--2726},
  publisher    = {OSA},
  series       = {Applied Optics},
  title        = {Anomalous celestial polarization caused by forest fire smoke: why do some insects become visually disoriented under smoky skies?},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2007},
}