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Revisiting the Past. Israeli identity, thick recognition and conflict transformation

Strömbom, Lisa LU (2010) In Lund Political Studies
Abstract
Intractable conflicts are by definition difficult to resolve. This study ventures into the identity dynamics of those conflicts and argues that those identity aspects must be addressed in order to locate constituencies for change. Through the employment o theories of conflict transformation, identity and narrative, the dissertation forwards thoughts regarding the importance of inside actors formulating narratives of recognition of the opponent in conflict. Through the recognition of deeply held identity aspects, such as the others' narratives of history, conflict relations might develop into new and more peaceful forms.

This study uses the Israeli debates over New History as a critical case in order to develop the concept of... (More)
Intractable conflicts are by definition difficult to resolve. This study ventures into the identity dynamics of those conflicts and argues that those identity aspects must be addressed in order to locate constituencies for change. Through the employment o theories of conflict transformation, identity and narrative, the dissertation forwards thoughts regarding the importance of inside actors formulating narratives of recognition of the opponent in conflict. Through the recognition of deeply held identity aspects, such as the others' narratives of history, conflict relations might develop into new and more peaceful forms.

This study uses the Israeli debates over New History as a critical case in order to develop the concept of thick recognition. Through elaborations on the case, the processes by which thick recignition are introduced and circumstances which make them either take root or wane are explored. The study identifies inside actors, here understood as memory-agents forwarding different view of history, as crucial in the process of transforming conflictual relations. The disseratation hence challenges the traditional focus on third party interventions and elite negotations within conflict teory, and suggests that those have little to offer as long as profound identity dynamics in conflicts, as well as interactions among their inside actors, are disregarded. (Less)
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author
supervisor
opponent
  • Ph D Nimni, Ephraim, Queen's University Belfast
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
memory institutions., memory agents, historiography, "New History", conflict transformation, Thick reocognition, identity theory, narrative theory, nationalism, post-Zionism, Israel
in
Lund Political Studies
pages
257 pages
publisher
Department of Political Science, Lund University
defense location
Kulturens Auditorium, Tegnérsplatsen, Lund
defense date
2010-11-12 10:15
ISSN
0460-0037
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a40a321b-9249-4fd4-af9e-00ae3e27a7cd (old id 1691351)
date added to LUP
2010-10-08 14:38:19
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:21:04
@phdthesis{a40a321b-9249-4fd4-af9e-00ae3e27a7cd,
  abstract     = {Intractable conflicts are by definition difficult to resolve. This study ventures into the identity dynamics of those conflicts and argues that those identity aspects must be addressed in order to locate constituencies for change. Through the employment o theories of conflict transformation, identity and narrative, the dissertation forwards thoughts regarding the importance of inside actors formulating narratives of recognition of the opponent in conflict. Through the recognition of deeply held identity aspects, such as the others' narratives of history, conflict relations might develop into new and more peaceful forms. <br/><br>
This study uses the Israeli debates over New History as a critical case in order to develop the concept of thick recognition. Through elaborations on the case, the processes by which thick recignition are introduced and circumstances which make them either take root or wane are explored. The study identifies inside actors, here understood as memory-agents forwarding different view of history, as crucial in the process of transforming conflictual relations. The disseratation hence challenges the traditional focus on third party interventions and elite negotations within conflict teory, and suggests that those have little to offer as long as profound identity dynamics in conflicts, as well as interactions among their inside actors, are disregarded.},
  author       = {Strömbom, Lisa},
  issn         = {0460-0037},
  keyword      = {memory institutions.,memory agents,historiography,"New History",conflict transformation,Thick reocognition,identity theory,narrative theory,nationalism,post-Zionism,Israel},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {257},
  publisher    = {Department of Political Science, Lund University},
  school       = {Lund University},
  series       = {Lund Political Studies},
  title        = {Revisiting the Past. Israeli identity, thick recognition and conflict transformation},
  year         = {2010},
}