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Infectious morbidity in 18-month-old children with and without older siblings

Hedin, Katarina LU ; Andre, Malin; Håkansson, Anders LU ; Molstad, Sigvard; Rodhe, Nils and Petersson, Christer (2010) In Family Practice 27(5). p.507-512
Abstract
Background. Infections are the most commonly reported health problems in children. Younger age and day care outside the home are two factors of importance for infectious morbidity. The influence of siblings on infectious symptoms is not clear. Objectives. To compare families with one child and families with more than one child in terms of reported infectious symptoms, physician consultations and antibiotic prescriptions. Methods. A prospective population-based survey was performed. During 1 month, all infectious symptoms, physician consultations and antibiotic prescriptions for 18-month-old children were noted by the parents. The 789 families also answered questions about socio-economic factors, numbers of siblings in the family and type... (More)
Background. Infections are the most commonly reported health problems in children. Younger age and day care outside the home are two factors of importance for infectious morbidity. The influence of siblings on infectious symptoms is not clear. Objectives. To compare families with one child and families with more than one child in terms of reported infectious symptoms, physician consultations and antibiotic prescriptions. Methods. A prospective population-based survey was performed. During 1 month, all infectious symptoms, physician consultations and antibiotic prescriptions for 18-month-old children were noted by the parents. The 789 families also answered questions about socio-economic factors, numbers of siblings in the family and type of day care. Results. No difference in number of symptom days was found between children with and without older siblings. Neither could we find any significance in terms of having older siblings in relation to physician consultations and antibiotic prescriptions. Conclusions. The results of our study indicate that having older siblings not was important in relation to number of symptoms days, physician consultations or antibiotic prescriptions for 18-month-old children in Sweden today. Changes in social activities and attitudes towards antibiotic prescription may explain our different findings as compared with previous Swedish studies and studies from other countries. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
physician, infectious symptom, Antibiotic prescription, child, consultation, siblings
in
Family Practice
volume
27
issue
5
pages
507 - 512
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000281956300007
  • scopus:77956929968
ISSN
1460-2229
DOI
10.1093/fampra/cmq041
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
32b7fb40-346c-4b73-8252-ce56c84fb88d (old id 1695981)
date added to LUP
2010-10-25 12:52:04
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:38:09
@article{32b7fb40-346c-4b73-8252-ce56c84fb88d,
  abstract     = {Background. Infections are the most commonly reported health problems in children. Younger age and day care outside the home are two factors of importance for infectious morbidity. The influence of siblings on infectious symptoms is not clear. Objectives. To compare families with one child and families with more than one child in terms of reported infectious symptoms, physician consultations and antibiotic prescriptions. Methods. A prospective population-based survey was performed. During 1 month, all infectious symptoms, physician consultations and antibiotic prescriptions for 18-month-old children were noted by the parents. The 789 families also answered questions about socio-economic factors, numbers of siblings in the family and type of day care. Results. No difference in number of symptom days was found between children with and without older siblings. Neither could we find any significance in terms of having older siblings in relation to physician consultations and antibiotic prescriptions. Conclusions. The results of our study indicate that having older siblings not was important in relation to number of symptoms days, physician consultations or antibiotic prescriptions for 18-month-old children in Sweden today. Changes in social activities and attitudes towards antibiotic prescription may explain our different findings as compared with previous Swedish studies and studies from other countries.},
  author       = {Hedin, Katarina and Andre, Malin and Håkansson, Anders and Molstad, Sigvard and Rodhe, Nils and Petersson, Christer},
  issn         = {1460-2229},
  keyword      = {physician,infectious symptom,Antibiotic prescription,child,consultation,siblings},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {507--512},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Family Practice},
  title        = {Infectious morbidity in 18-month-old children with and without older siblings},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmq041},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2010},
}