Advanced

Common vaccinations among adults do not increase the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Swedish EIRA study

Bengtsson, Camilla; C Kapetanovic, Meliha LU ; Kallberg, Henrik; Sverdrup, Berit; Nordmark, Birgitta; Klareskog, Lars and Alfredsson, Lars (2010) In Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 69(10). p.1831-1833
Abstract
Objective To investigate the association between vaccinations in adults and the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Data from the Swedish population-based Epidemiological Investigation of RA case-control study encompassing 1998 incident cases of RA aged 18-70 years and 2252 randomly selected controls matched for age, sex and residency were analysed. Those vaccinated within 5 years before disease onset were compared with those not vaccinated by calculating OR with 95% CI. Results Vaccinations neither increased the risk of RA overall (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.1) nor the risk of two major subgroups of RA (antibodies to citrullinated peptide-positive (ACPA-positive) and ACPA-negative disease). Furthermore, vaccinations did not... (More)
Objective To investigate the association between vaccinations in adults and the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Data from the Swedish population-based Epidemiological Investigation of RA case-control study encompassing 1998 incident cases of RA aged 18-70 years and 2252 randomly selected controls matched for age, sex and residency were analysed. Those vaccinated within 5 years before disease onset were compared with those not vaccinated by calculating OR with 95% CI. Results Vaccinations neither increased the risk of RA overall (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.1) nor the risk of two major subgroups of RA (antibodies to citrullinated peptide-positive (ACPA-positive) and ACPA-negative disease). Furthermore, vaccinations did not increase the risk of RA in smokers or carriers of HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles, two groups with established risk factors for RA. Conclusions In this case-control study of incident cases of newly diagnosed RA, no increased risk of RA following immunisation was observed for vaccinations overall or for any specific vaccination. This indicates that immunological provocation of adults with commonly used vaccines in their present form carries no risk of RA. These findings should be implemented among public healthcare providers in order to encourage vaccinations according to recommended national vaccination schedules. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
volume
69
issue
10
pages
1831 - 1833
publisher
British Medical Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000282006800018
  • scopus:77957253426
ISSN
1468-2060
DOI
10.1136/ard.2010.129908
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
81ca6622-7849-49f1-91a4-6255565bfc8a (old id 1696158)
date added to LUP
2010-10-25 12:07:44
date last changed
2018-06-24 04:11:24
@article{81ca6622-7849-49f1-91a4-6255565bfc8a,
  abstract     = {Objective To investigate the association between vaccinations in adults and the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Data from the Swedish population-based Epidemiological Investigation of RA case-control study encompassing 1998 incident cases of RA aged 18-70 years and 2252 randomly selected controls matched for age, sex and residency were analysed. Those vaccinated within 5 years before disease onset were compared with those not vaccinated by calculating OR with 95% CI. Results Vaccinations neither increased the risk of RA overall (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.1) nor the risk of two major subgroups of RA (antibodies to citrullinated peptide-positive (ACPA-positive) and ACPA-negative disease). Furthermore, vaccinations did not increase the risk of RA in smokers or carriers of HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles, two groups with established risk factors for RA. Conclusions In this case-control study of incident cases of newly diagnosed RA, no increased risk of RA following immunisation was observed for vaccinations overall or for any specific vaccination. This indicates that immunological provocation of adults with commonly used vaccines in their present form carries no risk of RA. These findings should be implemented among public healthcare providers in order to encourage vaccinations according to recommended national vaccination schedules.},
  author       = {Bengtsson, Camilla and C Kapetanovic, Meliha and Kallberg, Henrik and Sverdrup, Berit and Nordmark, Birgitta and Klareskog, Lars and Alfredsson, Lars},
  issn         = {1468-2060},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1831--1833},
  publisher    = {British Medical Association},
  series       = {Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases},
  title        = {Common vaccinations among adults do not increase the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Swedish EIRA study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ard.2010.129908},
  volume       = {69},
  year         = {2010},
}