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The Pan-Pacific Planet Search. VII. the Most Eccentric Planet Orbiting a Giant Star

Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Jones, M. I.; Horner, Jonathan; Kane, Stephen R.; Marshall, J. P.; Mustill, A. J. LU ; Jenkins, J. S.; Rojas, P. A.Pena; Zhao, Jinglin and Villaver, Eva, et al. (2017) In Astronomical Journal 154(6).
Abstract

Radial velocity observations from three instruments reveal the presence of a 4 M Jup planet candidate orbiting the K giant HD 76920. HD 76920b has an orbital eccentricity of 0.856 ±0.009, making it the most eccentric planet known to orbit an evolved star. There is no indication that HD 76920 has an unseen binary companion, suggesting a scattering event rather than Kozai oscillations as a probable culprit for the observed eccentricity. The candidate planet currently approaches to about four stellar radii from its host star, and is predicted to be engulfed on a ∼100 Myr timescale due to the combined effects of stellar evolution and tidal interactions.

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type
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
planetary systems, stars: evolution, stars: individual (HD 76920), techniques: radial velocities
in
Astronomical Journal
volume
154
issue
6
publisher
The American Astronomical Society
external identifiers
  • scopus:85039166921
ISSN
0004-6256
DOI
10.3847/1538-3881/aa9894
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
16a2c5a2-c9e6-4031-a936-ff901468dfb7
date added to LUP
2018-01-08 11:12:24
date last changed
2018-03-04 05:08:15
@article{16a2c5a2-c9e6-4031-a936-ff901468dfb7,
  abstract     = {<p>Radial velocity observations from three instruments reveal the presence of a 4 M <sub>Jup</sub> planet candidate orbiting the K giant HD 76920. HD 76920b has an orbital eccentricity of 0.856 ±0.009, making it the most eccentric planet known to orbit an evolved star. There is no indication that HD 76920 has an unseen binary companion, suggesting a scattering event rather than Kozai oscillations as a probable culprit for the observed eccentricity. The candidate planet currently approaches to about four stellar radii from its host star, and is predicted to be engulfed on a ∼100 Myr timescale due to the combined effects of stellar evolution and tidal interactions.</p>},
  articleno    = {274},
  author       = {Wittenmyer, Robert A. and Jones, M. I. and Horner, Jonathan and Kane, Stephen R. and Marshall, J. P. and Mustill, A. J. and Jenkins, J. S. and Rojas, P. A.Pena and Zhao, Jinglin and Villaver, Eva and Butler, R. P. and Clark, Jake},
  issn         = {0004-6256},
  keyword      = {planetary systems,stars: evolution,stars: individual (HD 76920),techniques: radial velocities},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  number       = {6},
  publisher    = {The American Astronomical Society},
  series       = {Astronomical Journal},
  title        = {The Pan-Pacific Planet Search. VII. the Most Eccentric Planet Orbiting a Giant Star},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3847/1538-3881/aa9894},
  volume       = {154},
  year         = {2017},
}