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Neuronal connectivity patterns in the compound eyes of Artemia salina and Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Branchiopoda)

Nässel, Dick; Elofsson, Rolf LU and Odselius, Rolf (1978) In Cell and Tissue Research 190. p.435-457
Abstract
The neuronal types and patterns in the visual system of the species Artemia salina and Daphina magna have been studied with the Golgi method and electron microscopy. The lamina contains five classes of neurons: photoreceptor axons, monopolar, centrifugal, tangential and amacrine neurons. The terminals of the receptor axons are distributed in two (A. salina) or three (D. magna) layers. The dilated terminals have an extensive and wide array of fine branches. One axon from each ommatidium bypasses the lamina and terminates in the medulla in A. salina. A. salina has four types of monopolar neurons, two of which are stratified, whereas in D. magna only two types are found, one of which is bistratified. Tangential T-neurons connect the lamina... (More)
The neuronal types and patterns in the visual system of the species Artemia salina and Daphina magna have been studied with the Golgi method and electron microscopy. The lamina contains five classes of neurons: photoreceptor axons, monopolar, centrifugal, tangential and amacrine neurons. The terminals of the receptor axons are distributed in two (A. salina) or three (D. magna) layers. The dilated terminals have an extensive and wide array of fine branches. One axon from each ommatidium bypasses the lamina and terminates in the medulla in A. salina. A. salina has four types of monopolar neurons, two of which are stratified, whereas in D. magna only two types are found, one of which is bistratified. Tangential T-neurons connect the lamina with the protocerebrum. D. magna has in addition one tangential T-neuron connecting both the lamina and the medulla with the protocerebrum. In both species monopolar-type centrifugal neurons connect the medulla and the lamina, whereas that of A. salina has a wide laminar distribution. Both species also have amacrine cells in the lamina. The medulla contains, besides those shared with the lamina, transmedullary neurons (two types in A. salina), amacrine cells and neurons originating in the protocerebrum.

“Cartridge”-type synaptic compartments are lacking in the investigated species, although a periodic arrangement is discernible in the distal portion of the lamina of A. salina. The receptors from three types of specialized contacts in Artemia, one of which involves a dyad. D. magna has only one-to-one synapses. Neurosecretory fibres are absent in A. salina.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Golgi method, Neurons
in
Cell and Tissue Research
volume
190
pages
435 - 457
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0018103171
ISSN
1432-0878
DOI
10.1007/BF00219557
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
16d50d59-fdf9-4108-ae66-313113ba0ed7
date added to LUP
2016-11-30 16:19:38
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:41:16
@article{16d50d59-fdf9-4108-ae66-313113ba0ed7,
  abstract     = {The neuronal types and patterns in the visual system of the species Artemia salina and Daphina magna have been studied with the Golgi method and electron microscopy. The lamina contains five classes of neurons: photoreceptor axons, monopolar, centrifugal, tangential and amacrine neurons. The terminals of the receptor axons are distributed in two (A. salina) or three (D. magna) layers. The dilated terminals have an extensive and wide array of fine branches. One axon from each ommatidium bypasses the lamina and terminates in the medulla in A. salina. A. salina has four types of monopolar neurons, two of which are stratified, whereas in D. magna only two types are found, one of which is bistratified. Tangential T-neurons connect the lamina with the protocerebrum. D. magna has in addition one tangential T-neuron connecting both the lamina and the medulla with the protocerebrum. In both species monopolar-type centrifugal neurons connect the medulla and the lamina, whereas that of A. salina has a wide laminar distribution. Both species also have amacrine cells in the lamina. The medulla contains, besides those shared with the lamina, transmedullary neurons (two types in A. salina), amacrine cells and neurons originating in the protocerebrum.<br/><br/>“Cartridge”-type synaptic compartments are lacking in the investigated species, although a periodic arrangement is discernible in the distal portion of the lamina of A. salina. The receptors from three types of specialized contacts in Artemia, one of which involves a dyad. D. magna has only one-to-one synapses. Neurosecretory fibres are absent in A. salina.<br/>},
  author       = {Nässel, Dick and Elofsson, Rolf and Odselius, Rolf},
  issn         = {1432-0878},
  keyword      = {Golgi method,Neurons},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {435--457},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Cell and Tissue Research},
  title        = {Neuronal connectivity patterns in the compound eyes of Artemia salina and Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Branchiopoda)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00219557},
  volume       = {190},
  year         = {1978},
}