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Caught in the Gendered Machine – on the Masculine and Feminine in Cyborg Leadership

Muhr, Sara Louise LU (2011) In Gender, Work and Organization 18(3). p.337-357
Abstract
Many studies have shown that female managers have to work harder than men to gain recognition, and that this often leads top female managers away from the leadership style characterized by soft skills and emotional understanding. Instead, another characterization can be seen; that of tough gendered machines fighting their way to the top - cyborgs. This article uses Haraway's metaphor of the cyborg to explore the way in which a top female manger tries to fight for gender equality by employing masculine strategies with a female body. However, contrary to the usual argument that women become masculinized leaders, the article argues for a reading in which female leadership becomes both excessively masculine and excessively feminine,... (More)
Many studies have shown that female managers have to work harder than men to gain recognition, and that this often leads top female managers away from the leadership style characterized by soft skills and emotional understanding. Instead, another characterization can be seen; that of tough gendered machines fighting their way to the top - cyborgs. This article uses Haraway's metaphor of the cyborg to explore the way in which a top female manger tries to fight for gender equality by employing masculine strategies with a female body. However, contrary to the usual argument that women become masculinized leaders, the article argues for a reading in which female leadership becomes both excessively masculine and excessively feminine, challenging simplified readings of gendered leadership. In the case-study, this leads to a situation where high-performance behaviour from a top female leader in effect ends up reinforcing gender inequality. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Gender, Work and Organization
volume
18
issue
3
pages
337 - 357
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000289730700006
  • scopus:79955005091
ISSN
1468-0432
DOI
10.1111/j.1468-0432.2010.00529.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3d810f79-7cd0-47df-b83a-05cc86d1c7e3 (old id 1713431)
date added to LUP
2010-11-11 12:46:24
date last changed
2017-10-29 04:03:50
@article{3d810f79-7cd0-47df-b83a-05cc86d1c7e3,
  abstract     = {Many studies have shown that female managers have to work harder than men to gain recognition, and that this often leads top female managers away from the leadership style characterized by soft skills and emotional understanding. Instead, another characterization can be seen; that of tough gendered machines fighting their way to the top - cyborgs. This article uses Haraway's metaphor of the cyborg to explore the way in which a top female manger tries to fight for gender equality by employing masculine strategies with a female body. However, contrary to the usual argument that women become masculinized leaders, the article argues for a reading in which female leadership becomes both excessively masculine and excessively feminine, challenging simplified readings of gendered leadership. In the case-study, this leads to a situation where high-performance behaviour from a top female leader in effect ends up reinforcing gender inequality.},
  author       = {Muhr, Sara Louise},
  issn         = {1468-0432},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {337--357},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Gender, Work and Organization},
  title        = {Caught in the Gendered Machine – on the Masculine and Feminine in Cyborg Leadership},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0432.2010.00529.x},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2011},
}