Advanced

Strangers in Familiar Places – Using Generic Spaces in Cross-Cultural Identity Work

Muhr, Sara Louise LU (2012) In Culture and Organization 18(1). p.51-68
Abstract (Swedish)
Abstract in Undetermined

Employees working across multiple cultures are exposed to a vast number of different norms and values, and consequentially work is often a struggle to retain a coherent sense of self. However, when international workers travel, they also encounter more bland spaces where familiarity and similarity are important. These spaces appear culturally generic to the Western traveler, but are highly Westernized to bring comfort to Western employees traveling in foreign cultures. This paper argues that these spaces are important in cross-cultural identity work in the sense that international workers - professional strangers - need these places to belong and relate to familiarity and to regain a sense of... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined

Employees working across multiple cultures are exposed to a vast number of different norms and values, and consequentially work is often a struggle to retain a coherent sense of self. However, when international workers travel, they also encounter more bland spaces where familiarity and similarity are important. These spaces appear culturally generic to the Western traveler, but are highly Westernized to bring comfort to Western employees traveling in foreign cultures. This paper argues that these spaces are important in cross-cultural identity work in the sense that international workers - professional strangers - need these places to belong and relate to familiarity and to regain a sense of identity. Drawing on an illustrative empirical vignette of an international consultant, I demonstrate how culturally generic spaces can be used in identity work of an international relations consultant. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
identity work, postcolonialism, non-places, globalization, culture, generic, belongingness, professional strangers, cross-cultural work
in
Culture and Organization
volume
18
issue
1
pages
51 - 68
publisher
Routledge
external identifiers
  • wos:000301598200004
  • scopus:84857225719
ISSN
1477-2760
DOI
10.1080/14759551.2011.631340
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4afcd291-ce61-4996-8797-326354146284 (old id 1713440)
date added to LUP
2010-11-11 11:02:05
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:31:51
@article{4afcd291-ce61-4996-8797-326354146284,
  abstract     = {<b>Abstract in Undetermined</b><br/><br>
Employees working across multiple cultures are exposed to a vast number of different norms and values, and consequentially work is often a struggle to retain a coherent sense of self. However, when international workers travel, they also encounter more bland spaces where familiarity and similarity are important. These spaces appear culturally generic to the Western traveler, but are highly Westernized to bring comfort to Western employees traveling in foreign cultures. This paper argues that these spaces are important in cross-cultural identity work in the sense that international workers - professional strangers - need these places to belong and relate to familiarity and to regain a sense of identity. Drawing on an illustrative empirical vignette of an international consultant, I demonstrate how culturally generic spaces can be used in identity work of an international relations consultant.},
  author       = {Muhr, Sara Louise},
  issn         = {1477-2760},
  keyword      = {identity work,postcolonialism,non-places,globalization,culture,generic,belongingness,professional strangers,cross-cultural work},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {51--68},
  publisher    = {Routledge},
  series       = {Culture and Organization},
  title        = {Strangers in Familiar Places – Using Generic Spaces in Cross-Cultural Identity Work},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14759551.2011.631340},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2012},
}