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Mycotoxins in the ventilation systems of four schools in Finland

Hintikka, E. -L.; Holopainen, R.; Asola, A.; Jestoi, M.; Peitzsch, Mirko LU ; Kalso, S.; Larsson, Lennart LU ; Reijula, K. and Tuomi, T. (2009) In World Mycotoxin Journal 2(4). p.369-379
Abstract
Some fungal species have been listed as a problem causing fungi in indoor air and most of this group are known to produce mycotoxins. So far, mycotoxins have been found in building materials and in samples representing settled indoor air dust, as well in air samples from industrial or agricultural environments. The present paper presents the results of a mycological study and mycotoxin analyses of dust collected from mechanical ventilation systems in four school buildings in southern Finland. The aim of this work was to answer the question 'Are there mycotoxins in ventilation systems and if so, from where do they originate?' A total of 40 mycotoxins representing indoor and outdoor sources alike were screened in this study, while cultivable... (More)
Some fungal species have been listed as a problem causing fungi in indoor air and most of this group are known to produce mycotoxins. So far, mycotoxins have been found in building materials and in samples representing settled indoor air dust, as well in air samples from industrial or agricultural environments. The present paper presents the results of a mycological study and mycotoxin analyses of dust collected from mechanical ventilation systems in four school buildings in southern Finland. The aim of this work was to answer the question 'Are there mycotoxins in ventilation systems and if so, from where do they originate?' A total of 40 mycotoxins representing indoor and outdoor sources alike were screened in this study, while cultivable fungi were screened using four different cultivation media. Mycotoxins were present in all ventilation systems studied, both in the supply and the exhaust systems examined. The mycotoxins found included satratoxins, verrucarol, trichodermol, enniatins, beauvericin, penicillic acid, sterigmatocystin, chaetoglobosin A, and aflatoxins B-1. The mycotoxins were present in minute quantities (pg-ng/g or pg-ng/cm(2)). The fungal genera associated with respective mycotoxins were found in most of the same sources. Since much the same mycotoxins could be established in both exhaust and supply air systems, it would appear that the mycotoxins found in the schools studied do not for the most part originate from sources within the building but are either normal artefacts of incoming supply air or concentrate or are perhaps produced within the ventilation systems due to infrequent changing of filters and maintenance/cleaning of ventilation ducts and associated parts of the systems. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
ventilation system, satratoxins, beauvericin, dust, trichothecenes
in
World Mycotoxin Journal
volume
2
issue
4
pages
369 - 379
publisher
Wageningen Academic Publishers
external identifiers
  • wos:000282995700001
  • scopus:70449659353
ISSN
1875-0796
DOI
10.3920/WMJ2009.1155
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fbe56908-79f2-4177-b43e-dbb3c1a8ff67 (old id 1719729)
date added to LUP
2010-12-23 10:33:14
date last changed
2017-08-13 03:43:38
@article{fbe56908-79f2-4177-b43e-dbb3c1a8ff67,
  abstract     = {Some fungal species have been listed as a problem causing fungi in indoor air and most of this group are known to produce mycotoxins. So far, mycotoxins have been found in building materials and in samples representing settled indoor air dust, as well in air samples from industrial or agricultural environments. The present paper presents the results of a mycological study and mycotoxin analyses of dust collected from mechanical ventilation systems in four school buildings in southern Finland. The aim of this work was to answer the question 'Are there mycotoxins in ventilation systems and if so, from where do they originate?' A total of 40 mycotoxins representing indoor and outdoor sources alike were screened in this study, while cultivable fungi were screened using four different cultivation media. Mycotoxins were present in all ventilation systems studied, both in the supply and the exhaust systems examined. The mycotoxins found included satratoxins, verrucarol, trichodermol, enniatins, beauvericin, penicillic acid, sterigmatocystin, chaetoglobosin A, and aflatoxins B-1. The mycotoxins were present in minute quantities (pg-ng/g or pg-ng/cm(2)). The fungal genera associated with respective mycotoxins were found in most of the same sources. Since much the same mycotoxins could be established in both exhaust and supply air systems, it would appear that the mycotoxins found in the schools studied do not for the most part originate from sources within the building but are either normal artefacts of incoming supply air or concentrate or are perhaps produced within the ventilation systems due to infrequent changing of filters and maintenance/cleaning of ventilation ducts and associated parts of the systems.},
  author       = {Hintikka, E. -L. and Holopainen, R. and Asola, A. and Jestoi, M. and Peitzsch, Mirko and Kalso, S. and Larsson, Lennart and Reijula, K. and Tuomi, T.},
  issn         = {1875-0796},
  keyword      = {ventilation system,satratoxins,beauvericin,dust,trichothecenes},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {369--379},
  publisher    = {Wageningen Academic Publishers},
  series       = {World Mycotoxin Journal},
  title        = {Mycotoxins in the ventilation systems of four schools in Finland},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3920/WMJ2009.1155},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2009},
}