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Submersion, accidental hypothermia and cardiac arrest, mechanical chest compressions as a bridge to final treatment: a case report

Friberg, Hans LU and Rundgren, Malin LU (2009) In Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine 17.
Abstract
Three young men were trapped in a car at the bottom of a canal at two meters depth, after losing control of their vehicle. They were brought up by rescue divers and found in cardiac arrest. One of three patients had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), at 47 min after the accident. This sole survivor had the longest submersion time of the three and he received continued mechanical chest compressions during transportation to the hospital. His temperature at admission was 26.9 degrees C, he was rewarmed to 33 degrees C and kept there for 24 h, followed by continued rewarming to normothermia. On day three, he woke up from coma and was discharged from the intensive care unit after one week. At follow-up six months later, he had a complete... (More)
Three young men were trapped in a car at the bottom of a canal at two meters depth, after losing control of their vehicle. They were brought up by rescue divers and found in cardiac arrest. One of three patients had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), at 47 min after the accident. This sole survivor had the longest submersion time of the three and he received continued mechanical chest compressions during transportation to the hospital. His temperature at admission was 26.9 degrees C, he was rewarmed to 33 degrees C and kept there for 24 h, followed by continued rewarming to normothermia. On day three, he woke up from coma and was discharged from the intensive care unit after one week. At follow-up six months later, he had a complete cerebral recovery but still had myoclonic twitches in the lower extremities. A mechanical device facilitates chest compressions during transportation and may be beneficial as a bridge to final treatment in the hospital. We recommend that comatose patients after submersion, accidental hypothermia and cardiac arrest are treated with mild hypothermia for 12-24 h. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
volume
17
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000283025400002
  • scopus:78751598287
ISSN
1757-7241
DOI
10.1186/1757-7241-17-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
12cadc13-b3b7-4f03-86d1-18ef32526d1f (old id 1719740)
date added to LUP
2010-12-23 12:56:28
date last changed
2017-09-17 05:55:28
@article{12cadc13-b3b7-4f03-86d1-18ef32526d1f,
  abstract     = {Three young men were trapped in a car at the bottom of a canal at two meters depth, after losing control of their vehicle. They were brought up by rescue divers and found in cardiac arrest. One of three patients had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), at 47 min after the accident. This sole survivor had the longest submersion time of the three and he received continued mechanical chest compressions during transportation to the hospital. His temperature at admission was 26.9 degrees C, he was rewarmed to 33 degrees C and kept there for 24 h, followed by continued rewarming to normothermia. On day three, he woke up from coma and was discharged from the intensive care unit after one week. At follow-up six months later, he had a complete cerebral recovery but still had myoclonic twitches in the lower extremities. A mechanical device facilitates chest compressions during transportation and may be beneficial as a bridge to final treatment in the hospital. We recommend that comatose patients after submersion, accidental hypothermia and cardiac arrest are treated with mild hypothermia for 12-24 h.},
  author       = {Friberg, Hans and Rundgren, Malin},
  issn         = {1757-7241},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine},
  title        = {Submersion, accidental hypothermia and cardiac arrest, mechanical chest compressions as a bridge to final treatment: a case report},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1757-7241-17-7},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2009},
}