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The effect of combined treatment with morphine sulphate and low-dose ketamine in a prehospital setting

Johansson, Patric; Kongstad, Poul LU and Johansson, Anders LU (2009) In Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine 17.
Abstract
Background: Pain is a common condition among prehospital patients. The present study is designed to determine whether adding low-dose ketamine as additional analgesia improves the pain/nausea scores and hemodynamic parameters compared to morphine sulphate alone among patients with bone fractures. Methods: Prospective, prehospital clinical cohort study. Twenty-seven patients were included with acute pain. Eleven patients received morphine sulphate 0.2 mg/kg (M-group) and 16 patients received morphine sulphate 0.1 mg/kg combined with 0.2 mg/kg ketamine (MK-group). Scores for pain, nausea, sedation (AVPU) and the haemodynamic parameters (systolic blood pressures (BP), heart rate (HR) and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded at... (More)
Background: Pain is a common condition among prehospital patients. The present study is designed to determine whether adding low-dose ketamine as additional analgesia improves the pain/nausea scores and hemodynamic parameters compared to morphine sulphate alone among patients with bone fractures. Methods: Prospective, prehospital clinical cohort study. Twenty-seven patients were included with acute pain. Eleven patients received morphine sulphate 0.2 mg/kg (M-group) and 16 patients received morphine sulphate 0.1 mg/kg combined with 0.2 mg/kg ketamine (MK-group). Scores for pain, nausea, sedation (AVPU) and the haemodynamic parameters (systolic blood pressures (BP), heart rate (HR) and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded at rescue scene before the start of analgesia and subsequently to admission at hospital. Results: Mean treatment time 46 +/- 17 minutes in the M-group and 56 +/- 11 minutes in the MK-group, respectively (ns). Mean doses of morphine sulphate in the M-group were 13.5 +/- 3.2 mg versus 7.0 +/- 1.5 mg in the MK-group. The mean additional doses of ketamine in the MK-group were 27.9 +/- 11.4 mg. There were significantly differences between the M-and the MK-group according to NRS scores for pain (5.4 +/- 1.9 versus 3.1 +/- 1.4) and BP (134 +/- 21 mmHg versus 167 +/- 32 mmHg) at admission at hospital, respectively (P < 0.05). All patients were Alert or respond to Voice and the results were similar between the groups. One patient versus 4 patients reported nausea in the M-and MK-group, respectively, and 3 patients vomited in the Mk-group (ns). Conclusion: We conclude that morphine sulphate with addition of small doses of ketamine provide adequate pain relief in patients with bone fractures, with an increase in systolic blood pressure, but without significant side effects. (Less)
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
volume
17
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000283035600002
  • scopus:79952278040
ISSN
1757-7241
DOI
10.1186/1757-7241-17-61
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0855f374-3447-4ce2-8173-3af381cee873 (old id 1719744)
date added to LUP
2010-12-23 12:58:10
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:04:15
@article{0855f374-3447-4ce2-8173-3af381cee873,
  abstract     = {Background: Pain is a common condition among prehospital patients. The present study is designed to determine whether adding low-dose ketamine as additional analgesia improves the pain/nausea scores and hemodynamic parameters compared to morphine sulphate alone among patients with bone fractures. Methods: Prospective, prehospital clinical cohort study. Twenty-seven patients were included with acute pain. Eleven patients received morphine sulphate 0.2 mg/kg (M-group) and 16 patients received morphine sulphate 0.1 mg/kg combined with 0.2 mg/kg ketamine (MK-group). Scores for pain, nausea, sedation (AVPU) and the haemodynamic parameters (systolic blood pressures (BP), heart rate (HR) and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded at rescue scene before the start of analgesia and subsequently to admission at hospital. Results: Mean treatment time 46 +/- 17 minutes in the M-group and 56 +/- 11 minutes in the MK-group, respectively (ns). Mean doses of morphine sulphate in the M-group were 13.5 +/- 3.2 mg versus 7.0 +/- 1.5 mg in the MK-group. The mean additional doses of ketamine in the MK-group were 27.9 +/- 11.4 mg. There were significantly differences between the M-and the MK-group according to NRS scores for pain (5.4 +/- 1.9 versus 3.1 +/- 1.4) and BP (134 +/- 21 mmHg versus 167 +/- 32 mmHg) at admission at hospital, respectively (P &lt; 0.05). All patients were Alert or respond to Voice and the results were similar between the groups. One patient versus 4 patients reported nausea in the M-and MK-group, respectively, and 3 patients vomited in the Mk-group (ns). Conclusion: We conclude that morphine sulphate with addition of small doses of ketamine provide adequate pain relief in patients with bone fractures, with an increase in systolic blood pressure, but without significant side effects.},
  author       = {Johansson, Patric and Kongstad, Poul and Johansson, Anders},
  issn         = {1757-7241},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine},
  title        = {The effect of combined treatment with morphine sulphate and low-dose ketamine in a prehospital setting},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1757-7241-17-61},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2009},
}