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Can Training Eyemovements Hinder Visual Search?

Dewhurst, Richard LU and Crundall, David (2007) European Society for Cognitive Psychology
Abstract
There have long been assumptions about optimal visual

strategies for specific tasks, arising from the differences noted

between experts’ and novices’ eye movements in domains as

diverse as reading, driving, rifle shooting, and cricket. However,

because there remains a gulf between theoretical models of eyemovement

control (e.g Findlay & Walker, 1999) and their use in

applied contexts, simply training novices eye-movements to

resemble those of experts may not lead to improvements in

performance (Donovan, Manning, Phillips, Highman, &

Crawford, 2005). It is plausible, based on Findlay & Walkers

model of saccade generation, that only training... (More)
There have long been assumptions about optimal visual

strategies for specific tasks, arising from the differences noted

between experts’ and novices’ eye movements in domains as

diverse as reading, driving, rifle shooting, and cricket. However,

because there remains a gulf between theoretical models of eyemovement

control (e.g Findlay & Walker, 1999) and their use in

applied contexts, simply training novices eye-movements to

resemble those of experts may not lead to improvements in

performance (Donovan, Manning, Phillips, Highman, &

Crawford, 2005). It is plausible, based on Findlay & Walkers

model of saccade generation, that only training people where to

look actually hinders the ability to process foveated stimuli (via

activation of the centre concerned with generating saccades and

inhibition of the centre concerned with maintaining fixation). A

series of experiments attempts to demonstrate this result,

suggesting that optimal training for complex visual tasks should

focus both on saccades and fixations. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Training eye movements, Saccades, Fixations, Visual Search
conference name
European Society for Cognitive Psychology
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
ca167c79-5476-44fb-a64a-e8aff324e4f1 (old id 1719908)
date added to LUP
2010-11-29 14:49:03
date last changed
2016-06-29 09:17:42
@misc{ca167c79-5476-44fb-a64a-e8aff324e4f1,
  abstract     = {There have long been assumptions about optimal visual<br/><br>
strategies for specific tasks, arising from the differences noted<br/><br>
between experts’ and novices’ eye movements in domains as<br/><br>
diverse as reading, driving, rifle shooting, and cricket. However,<br/><br>
because there remains a gulf between theoretical models of eyemovement<br/><br>
control (e.g Findlay &amp; Walker, 1999) and their use in<br/><br>
applied contexts, simply training novices eye-movements to<br/><br>
resemble those of experts may not lead to improvements in<br/><br>
performance (Donovan, Manning, Phillips, Highman, &amp;<br/><br>
Crawford, 2005). It is plausible, based on Findlay &amp; Walkers<br/><br>
model of saccade generation, that only training people where to<br/><br>
look actually hinders the ability to process foveated stimuli (via<br/><br>
activation of the centre concerned with generating saccades and<br/><br>
inhibition of the centre concerned with maintaining fixation). A<br/><br>
series of experiments attempts to demonstrate this result,<br/><br>
suggesting that optimal training for complex visual tasks should<br/><br>
focus both on saccades and fixations.},
  author       = {Dewhurst, Richard and Crundall, David},
  keyword      = {Training eye movements,Saccades,Fixations,Visual Search},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Can Training Eyemovements Hinder Visual Search?},
  year         = {2007},
}