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Multiple stressors on biotic interactions: how climate change and alien species interact to affect pollination

Schweiger, Oliver; Biesmeijer, Jacobus C.; Bommarco, Riccardo; Hickler, Thomas LU ; Hulme, Philip E.; Klotz, Stefan; Kuehn, Ingolf; Moora, Mari; Nielsen, Anders and Ohlemueller, Ralf, et al. (2010) In Biological Reviews 85(4). p.777-795
Abstract
Global change may substantially affect biodiversity and ecosystem functioning but little is known about its effects on essential biotic interactions. Since different environmental drivers rarely act in isolation it is important to consider interactive effects. Here, we focus on how two key drivers of anthropogenic environmental change, climate change and the introduction of alien species, affect plant-pollinator interactions. Based on a literature survey we identify climatically sensitive aspects of species interactions, assess potential effects of climate change on these mechanisms, and derive hypotheses that may form the basis of future research. We find that both climate change and alien species will ultimately lead to the creation of... (More)
Global change may substantially affect biodiversity and ecosystem functioning but little is known about its effects on essential biotic interactions. Since different environmental drivers rarely act in isolation it is important to consider interactive effects. Here, we focus on how two key drivers of anthropogenic environmental change, climate change and the introduction of alien species, affect plant-pollinator interactions. Based on a literature survey we identify climatically sensitive aspects of species interactions, assess potential effects of climate change on these mechanisms, and derive hypotheses that may form the basis of future research. We find that both climate change and alien species will ultimately lead to the creation of novel communities. In these communities certain interactions may no longer occur while there will also be potential for the emergence of new relationships. Alien species can both partly compensate for the often negative effects of climate change but also amplify them in some cases. Since potential positive effects are often restricted to generalist interactions among species, climate change and alien species in combination can result in significant threats to more specialist interactions involving native species. (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
higher order effects, global change, services, ecosystem, ecosystem functions, biological invasions, competition, species interactions, pollination, multiple drivers
in
Biological Reviews
volume
85
issue
4
pages
777 - 795
publisher
Wiley Online Library
external identifiers
  • wos:000282880900005
  • scopus:77954804802
ISSN
1469-185X
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-185X.2010.00125.x
project
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8f148265-a381-4ac5-87c0-59f29bfc08a4 (old id 1721130)
date added to LUP
2010-12-06 10:35:08
date last changed
2018-07-01 03:00:04
@article{8f148265-a381-4ac5-87c0-59f29bfc08a4,
  abstract     = {Global change may substantially affect biodiversity and ecosystem functioning but little is known about its effects on essential biotic interactions. Since different environmental drivers rarely act in isolation it is important to consider interactive effects. Here, we focus on how two key drivers of anthropogenic environmental change, climate change and the introduction of alien species, affect plant-pollinator interactions. Based on a literature survey we identify climatically sensitive aspects of species interactions, assess potential effects of climate change on these mechanisms, and derive hypotheses that may form the basis of future research. We find that both climate change and alien species will ultimately lead to the creation of novel communities. In these communities certain interactions may no longer occur while there will also be potential for the emergence of new relationships. Alien species can both partly compensate for the often negative effects of climate change but also amplify them in some cases. Since potential positive effects are often restricted to generalist interactions among species, climate change and alien species in combination can result in significant threats to more specialist interactions involving native species.},
  author       = {Schweiger, Oliver and Biesmeijer, Jacobus C. and Bommarco, Riccardo and Hickler, Thomas and Hulme, Philip E. and Klotz, Stefan and Kuehn, Ingolf and Moora, Mari and Nielsen, Anders and Ohlemueller, Ralf and Petanidou, Theodora and Potts, Simon G. and Pysek, Petr and Stout, Jane C. and Sykes, Martin and Tscheulin, Thomas and Vila, Montserrat and Walther, Gian-Reto and Westphal, Catrin and Winter, Marten and Zobel, Martin and Settele, Josef},
  issn         = {1469-185X},
  keyword      = {higher order effects,global change,services,ecosystem,ecosystem functions,biological invasions,competition,species interactions,pollination,multiple drivers},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {777--795},
  publisher    = {Wiley Online Library},
  series       = {Biological Reviews},
  title        = {Multiple stressors on biotic interactions: how climate change and alien species interact to affect pollination},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-185X.2010.00125.x},
  volume       = {85},
  year         = {2010},
}