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Symptoms 10-17 years after breast cancer radiotherapy data from the randomised SWEBCG91-RT trial

Lundstedt, Dan; Gustafsson, Magnus; Malmström, Per LU ; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Alsadius, David; Sundberg, Agnetha; Wilderang, Ulrica; Holmberg, Erik; Anderson, Harald and Steineck, Gunnar, et al. (2010) In Radiotherapy and Oncology 97(2). p.281-287
Abstract
Background: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases the risk for local and improves overall survival in women with breast cancer. We have limited information on radiotherapy-induced symptoms 10-17 years after therapy. Material and methods: Between 1997 and 1997, women with lymph node-negative breast cancer were randomised in a Swedish multi-institutional trial to breast conserving surgery with or without postoperative radiotherapy. In 2007, 10-17 years after randomisation, the group included 422 recurrence-free women. We collected data with a study-specific questionnaire on eight pre-selected symptom groups. Results: Fox six symptom group (oedema in breast or arm, erysipelas, heart symptoms, lung symptoms, rib fractures, and decreased... (More)
Background: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases the risk for local and improves overall survival in women with breast cancer. We have limited information on radiotherapy-induced symptoms 10-17 years after therapy. Material and methods: Between 1997 and 1997, women with lymph node-negative breast cancer were randomised in a Swedish multi-institutional trial to breast conserving surgery with or without postoperative radiotherapy. In 2007, 10-17 years after randomisation, the group included 422 recurrence-free women. We collected data with a study-specific questionnaire on eight pre-selected symptom groups. Results: Fox six symptom group (oedema in breast or arm, erysipelas, heart symptoms, lung symptoms, rib fractures, and decreased shoulder mobility) we found similar occurrence in both groups. Excess occurence after radiotherapy was observed for pain in the breast or in the skin, reported to occur "occasionally" by 38.1% of survivors having undergone radiotherapy and surgery versus 24.0% of those with surgery alone (absolute difference 14.1%; p = 0.004) and at least once a week by 10.3% of the radiotherapy group versus 1.7% (absolute difference 8.6%; p = 0.001). Daily life and analgesic use did not differ between the groups. Conclusion: Ten to 17 years after postoperative radiotherapy 1 in 12 women had weekly pain that could be attributed to radiotherapy. The symptoms did not significantly affect daily life and thus the reduced risk for local recurrence seems to outweight the risk for long-term symptoms for most women. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Radiotherapy and Oncology 97 (2010) 281-287 (Less)
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publication status
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subject
keywords
Long-term symptoms, Randomised, Breast Cancer
in
Radiotherapy and Oncology
volume
97
issue
2
pages
281 - 287
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000284812800021
  • scopus:78149359625
ISSN
1879-0887
DOI
10.1016/j.radonc.2010.09.018
language
English
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yes
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3ba716f2-a70d-4da5-b338-f2a195e08f20 (old id 1751601)
date added to LUP
2011-01-04 08:10:27
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:24:47
@article{3ba716f2-a70d-4da5-b338-f2a195e08f20,
  abstract     = {Background: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases the risk for local and improves overall survival in women with breast cancer. We have limited information on radiotherapy-induced symptoms 10-17 years after therapy. Material and methods: Between 1997 and 1997, women with lymph node-negative breast cancer were randomised in a Swedish multi-institutional trial to breast conserving surgery with or without postoperative radiotherapy. In 2007, 10-17 years after randomisation, the group included 422 recurrence-free women. We collected data with a study-specific questionnaire on eight pre-selected symptom groups. Results: Fox six symptom group (oedema in breast or arm, erysipelas, heart symptoms, lung symptoms, rib fractures, and decreased shoulder mobility) we found similar occurrence in both groups. Excess occurence after radiotherapy was observed for pain in the breast or in the skin, reported to occur "occasionally" by 38.1% of survivors having undergone radiotherapy and surgery versus 24.0% of those with surgery alone (absolute difference 14.1%; p = 0.004) and at least once a week by 10.3% of the radiotherapy group versus 1.7% (absolute difference 8.6%; p = 0.001). Daily life and analgesic use did not differ between the groups. Conclusion: Ten to 17 years after postoperative radiotherapy 1 in 12 women had weekly pain that could be attributed to radiotherapy. The symptoms did not significantly affect daily life and thus the reduced risk for local recurrence seems to outweight the risk for long-term symptoms for most women. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. Radiotherapy and Oncology 97 (2010) 281-287},
  author       = {Lundstedt, Dan and Gustafsson, Magnus and Malmström, Per and Johansson, Karl-Axel and Alsadius, David and Sundberg, Agnetha and Wilderang, Ulrica and Holmberg, Erik and Anderson, Harald and Steineck, Gunnar and Karlsson, Per},
  issn         = {1879-0887},
  keyword      = {Long-term symptoms,Randomised,Breast Cancer},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {281--287},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Radiotherapy and Oncology},
  title        = {Symptoms 10-17 years after breast cancer radiotherapy data from the randomised SWEBCG91-RT trial},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radonc.2010.09.018},
  volume       = {97},
  year         = {2010},
}