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Being next of kin to an elderly person with cancer

Esbensen, Bente Appel and Thomé, Bibbi LU (2010) In Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences 24(4). p.648-654
Abstract
Objectives: The aim of the study was to illuminate the experience of life as next of kin to an elderly person with cancer. Background: Being next of kin to an elderly person with cancer and its impact on everyday life has been sparsely researched. Such understanding is needed to support both the sufferers and their relatives in dealing with issues arising after a cancer diagnosis in old age. Design: A qualitative study was used to illuminate the experience of next of kin of elderly people with cancer. Method: In total, 16 (mean age 61, range 42-80) persons were interviewed. Open-ended interviews were used to get closer to their experiences. Manifest and latent content analysis were used. Findings: Two main categories, Transformations of... (More)
Objectives: The aim of the study was to illuminate the experience of life as next of kin to an elderly person with cancer. Background: Being next of kin to an elderly person with cancer and its impact on everyday life has been sparsely researched. Such understanding is needed to support both the sufferers and their relatives in dealing with issues arising after a cancer diagnosis in old age. Design: A qualitative study was used to illuminate the experience of next of kin of elderly people with cancer. Method: In total, 16 (mean age 61, range 42-80) persons were interviewed. Open-ended interviews were used to get closer to their experiences. Manifest and latent content analysis were used. Findings: Two main categories, Transformations of roles and Changed frames of mind, were identified, as well as four subcategories. The study showed that the cancer activated perceptions in the next of kin about ageing and growing old. The onset of the disease was a turning point, i.e. the disease highlighted that the patient had become old and the combination of this and the disease reinforced the negative image of old age in general. The next of kin found that the diagnosis of cancer was followed by role changes within the family. It awoke feelings of anger and doubt and made the next of kin stop and think about what is really important in life. Conclusion: With the onset of a serious illness, all next of kin are greatly affected in many ways but especially by changes in their roles, without, however, being prepared. The phenomenon of time seems to have significant meaning to the next of kin, although it may be perceived differently from the perspective of healthcare professionals than from that of next of kin. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
elderly with cancer, next of kin, experience, caring, roles, content, analysis
in
Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
volume
24
issue
4
pages
648 - 654
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000284121300003
  • scopus:78349293041
ISSN
1471-6712
DOI
10.1111/j.1471-6712.2009.00756.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bb3c2fa3-f74c-4189-b2d9-bd059e7c0137 (old id 1752323)
date added to LUP
2011-01-04 07:35:41
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:27:15
@article{bb3c2fa3-f74c-4189-b2d9-bd059e7c0137,
  abstract     = {Objectives: The aim of the study was to illuminate the experience of life as next of kin to an elderly person with cancer. Background: Being next of kin to an elderly person with cancer and its impact on everyday life has been sparsely researched. Such understanding is needed to support both the sufferers and their relatives in dealing with issues arising after a cancer diagnosis in old age. Design: A qualitative study was used to illuminate the experience of next of kin of elderly people with cancer. Method: In total, 16 (mean age 61, range 42-80) persons were interviewed. Open-ended interviews were used to get closer to their experiences. Manifest and latent content analysis were used. Findings: Two main categories, Transformations of roles and Changed frames of mind, were identified, as well as four subcategories. The study showed that the cancer activated perceptions in the next of kin about ageing and growing old. The onset of the disease was a turning point, i.e. the disease highlighted that the patient had become old and the combination of this and the disease reinforced the negative image of old age in general. The next of kin found that the diagnosis of cancer was followed by role changes within the family. It awoke feelings of anger and doubt and made the next of kin stop and think about what is really important in life. Conclusion: With the onset of a serious illness, all next of kin are greatly affected in many ways but especially by changes in their roles, without, however, being prepared. The phenomenon of time seems to have significant meaning to the next of kin, although it may be perceived differently from the perspective of healthcare professionals than from that of next of kin.},
  author       = {Esbensen, Bente Appel and Thomé, Bibbi},
  issn         = {1471-6712},
  keyword      = {elderly with cancer,next of kin,experience,caring,roles,content,analysis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {648--654},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences},
  title        = {Being next of kin to an elderly person with cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-6712.2009.00756.x},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2010},
}