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Principles of good care for long-term care facilities

Gibson, Maggie C.; Carter, Mary W.; Helmes, Edward and Edberg, Anna-Karin LU (2010) In International Psychogeriatrics 22(7). p.1072-1083
Abstract
Background: The International Psychogeriatric Association Task Force on Mental Health Services in Long-Term Care Facilities aims to support and strengthen mental health services in the long-term care sector. The purpose of this paper is to identify broad principles that may underpin the drive towards meeting the mental health needs of residents of long-term care facilities and their families, as well as to enhance the overall delivery of residential care services. Methods: Principles of good care are extrapolated from an analysis of international consensus documents and existing guidelines and discussed in relation to the research and practice literature. Results: Although the attention to principles is limited, this review reveals an... (More)
Background: The International Psychogeriatric Association Task Force on Mental Health Services in Long-Term Care Facilities aims to support and strengthen mental health services in the long-term care sector. The purpose of this paper is to identify broad principles that may underpin the drive towards meeting the mental health needs of residents of long-term care facilities and their families, as well as to enhance the overall delivery of residential care services. Methods: Principles of good care are extrapolated from an analysis of international consensus documents and existing guidelines and discussed in relation to the research and practice literature. Results: Although the attention to principles is limited, this review reveals an emerging consensus that: (1) residential care should be situated within a continuum of services which are accessible on the basis of need; (2) there should be an explicit focus on quality of care in long-term care facilities; and (3) quality of life for the residents of these facilities should be a primary objective. We take a broad perspective on the challenges associated with actualizing each of these principles, taking into consideration key issues for families, facilities, systems and societies. Conclusions: Recommendations for practice, policy and advocacy to establish an internationally endorsed principles-based framework for the evolution and development of good mental health care within long-term care facilities are provided. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
residential care, life, quality of, quality of care, continuum of care, aged, institutionalized, mental health, philosophy of care
in
International Psychogeriatrics
volume
22
issue
7
pages
1072 - 1083
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000284026200006
  • scopus:79952118235
ISSN
1741-203X
DOI
10.1017/S1041610210000852
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9de55136-0ce2-4165-a42c-2da309798d97 (old id 1753235)
date added to LUP
2011-01-04 08:07:09
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:51:00
@article{9de55136-0ce2-4165-a42c-2da309798d97,
  abstract     = {Background: The International Psychogeriatric Association Task Force on Mental Health Services in Long-Term Care Facilities aims to support and strengthen mental health services in the long-term care sector. The purpose of this paper is to identify broad principles that may underpin the drive towards meeting the mental health needs of residents of long-term care facilities and their families, as well as to enhance the overall delivery of residential care services. Methods: Principles of good care are extrapolated from an analysis of international consensus documents and existing guidelines and discussed in relation to the research and practice literature. Results: Although the attention to principles is limited, this review reveals an emerging consensus that: (1) residential care should be situated within a continuum of services which are accessible on the basis of need; (2) there should be an explicit focus on quality of care in long-term care facilities; and (3) quality of life for the residents of these facilities should be a primary objective. We take a broad perspective on the challenges associated with actualizing each of these principles, taking into consideration key issues for families, facilities, systems and societies. Conclusions: Recommendations for practice, policy and advocacy to establish an internationally endorsed principles-based framework for the evolution and development of good mental health care within long-term care facilities are provided.},
  author       = {Gibson, Maggie C. and Carter, Mary W. and Helmes, Edward and Edberg, Anna-Karin},
  issn         = {1741-203X},
  keyword      = {residential care,life,quality of,quality of care,continuum of care,aged,institutionalized,mental health,philosophy of care},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1072--1083},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {International Psychogeriatrics},
  title        = {Principles of good care for long-term care facilities},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1041610210000852},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2010},
}