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Characterization of oil and starch accumulation in tubers of Cyperus esculentus var. sativus (Cyperaceae): A novel model system to study oil reserves in nonseed tissues

Turesson, Helle; Marttila, Salla; Gustavsson, Karl-Erik; Hofvander, Per; Olsson, Marie E.; Bülow, Leif LU ; Stymne, Sten and Carlsson, Anders S. (2010) In American Journal of Botany 97(11). p.1884-1893
Abstract
Premise of the study: Storage oil (triacylglycerol) accumulates in tissues such as the embryo and endosperm of seeds and the fruit mesocarp, but seldom in underground organs. As a rare exception, cultivated variants of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) contain high amounts of both oil and starch in the mature tubers. Methods: Biochemical analyses and light and electron microscopy were used to study the accumulation patterns of storage nutrients in developing nutsedge tubers. Key results: During the initial phase of tuber development, the conducting rhizome tissue is transformed into a storage compartment, then massive storage reserves accumulate in the tuber. At the beginning of tuber development, a large sugar load coincided with the... (More)
Premise of the study: Storage oil (triacylglycerol) accumulates in tissues such as the embryo and endosperm of seeds and the fruit mesocarp, but seldom in underground organs. As a rare exception, cultivated variants of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) contain high amounts of both oil and starch in the mature tubers. Methods: Biochemical analyses and light and electron microscopy were used to study the accumulation patterns of storage nutrients in developing nutsedge tubers. Key results: During the initial phase of tuber development, the conducting rhizome tissue is transformed into a storage compartment, then massive storage reserves accumulate in the tuber. At the beginning of tuber development, a large sugar load coincided with the onset of starch accumulation. Oil accumulation started later, concomitant with a substantial drop in the sugar content. Initially, oil accumulated at a lower rate compared to starch, but the rate later increased; after 6 wk, oil made up 24% of tuber dry mass, while starch made up 32%. Protein concentration changed only a small amount throughout this development. Oil and starch accumulated in the same cells throughout the tubers in a sequential fashion during tuber development. Conclusions: The developmental pattern in the build up of storage nutrients in the tubers highlights nutsedge as a novel model plant, having potential to significantly widen our understanding on how synthesis of storage reserves, and in particular oils, is regulated and directed in nonseed tissues such as tubers and roots. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
triacylglycerol, sugar, starch, oil, Cyperus esculentus, carbon allocation, Cyperaceae, storage reserve, tuber
in
American Journal of Botany
volume
97
issue
11
pages
1884 - 1893
publisher
Botanical Society of America
external identifiers
  • wos:000283645500020
  • scopus:78249271051
ISSN
0002-9122
DOI
10.3732/ajb.1000200
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d5180144-3c62-463e-bd9b-72286f19a833 (old id 1753564)
date added to LUP
2010-12-29 10:56:03
date last changed
2018-07-01 03:57:29
@article{d5180144-3c62-463e-bd9b-72286f19a833,
  abstract     = {Premise of the study: Storage oil (triacylglycerol) accumulates in tissues such as the embryo and endosperm of seeds and the fruit mesocarp, but seldom in underground organs. As a rare exception, cultivated variants of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) contain high amounts of both oil and starch in the mature tubers. Methods: Biochemical analyses and light and electron microscopy were used to study the accumulation patterns of storage nutrients in developing nutsedge tubers. Key results: During the initial phase of tuber development, the conducting rhizome tissue is transformed into a storage compartment, then massive storage reserves accumulate in the tuber. At the beginning of tuber development, a large sugar load coincided with the onset of starch accumulation. Oil accumulation started later, concomitant with a substantial drop in the sugar content. Initially, oil accumulated at a lower rate compared to starch, but the rate later increased; after 6 wk, oil made up 24% of tuber dry mass, while starch made up 32%. Protein concentration changed only a small amount throughout this development. Oil and starch accumulated in the same cells throughout the tubers in a sequential fashion during tuber development. Conclusions: The developmental pattern in the build up of storage nutrients in the tubers highlights nutsedge as a novel model plant, having potential to significantly widen our understanding on how synthesis of storage reserves, and in particular oils, is regulated and directed in nonseed tissues such as tubers and roots.},
  author       = {Turesson, Helle and Marttila, Salla and Gustavsson, Karl-Erik and Hofvander, Per and Olsson, Marie E. and Bülow, Leif and Stymne, Sten and Carlsson, Anders S.},
  issn         = {0002-9122},
  keyword      = {triacylglycerol,sugar,starch,oil,Cyperus esculentus,carbon allocation,Cyperaceae,storage reserve,tuber},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1884--1893},
  publisher    = {Botanical Society of America},
  series       = {American Journal of Botany},
  title        = {Characterization of oil and starch accumulation in tubers of Cyperus esculentus var. sativus (Cyperaceae): A novel model system to study oil reserves in nonseed tissues},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3732/ajb.1000200},
  volume       = {97},
  year         = {2010},
}