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Circadian variation in concentration of anti-Mullerian hormone in regularly menstruating females: relation to age, gonadotrophin and sex steroid levels.

Bungum, Leif LU ; Jacobsson, Anna-Karin LU ; Rosén, Fredrik; Becker, Charlotte LU ; Yding Andersen, Claus; Güner, Nuray and Giwercman, Aleksander LU (2011) In Human Reproduction 26. p.678-684
Abstract
BACKGROUND Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is a promising marker of ovarian reserve. The aim of the study is to assess the circadian variation in AMH, and to evaluate its clinical relevance and biological aspects as an effect of age and other endocrine mechanisms involved in the regulation of AMH secretion. METHODS Nineteen healthy non-smoking, regularly menstruating female volunteers with body mass index below 30 kg/m(2), 10 aged 20-30 years (Group A) and 9 aged 35-45 (Group B) were included. Blood sampling, initiated at 8:00 a.m. on Days 2-6 of the menstrual cycle, was continued every second hour until 8:00 a.m. the following day. Serum levels of AMH, FSH, LH, progesterone and estradiol were measured. RESULTS With 8:00 a.m. values at the... (More)
BACKGROUND Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is a promising marker of ovarian reserve. The aim of the study is to assess the circadian variation in AMH, and to evaluate its clinical relevance and biological aspects as an effect of age and other endocrine mechanisms involved in the regulation of AMH secretion. METHODS Nineteen healthy non-smoking, regularly menstruating female volunteers with body mass index below 30 kg/m(2), 10 aged 20-30 years (Group A) and 9 aged 35-45 (Group B) were included. Blood sampling, initiated at 8:00 a.m. on Days 2-6 of the menstrual cycle, was continued every second hour until 8:00 a.m. the following day. Serum levels of AMH, FSH, LH, progesterone and estradiol were measured. RESULTS With 8:00 a.m. values at the first day of investigation as a reference, the mean concentrations in the pooled data revealed a significantly lower level at 4:00 a.m. (P = 0.021) and 6:00 a.m. (P = 0.005) with a maximum mean difference of 1.9 pmol/l (10.6%). The same pattern was seen in both the age groups. Including both the age groups, the overall circadian variation of the AMH levels did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.059). A significant positive correlation between AMH and LH concentration was seen over the 24-h period (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS A slight decrease in serum AMH levels during the late night appears not clinically relevant. Co-variation in the levels of LH and AMH might indicate joint regulatory mechanisms for the latter hormone and gonadotrophins. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Human Reproduction
volume
26
pages
678 - 684
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000287252800024
  • pmid:21227943
  • scopus:79951561030
ISSN
0268-1161
DOI
10.1093/humrep/deq380
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3cc944ba-e368-4f9a-860b-1b7e6a85311b (old id 1777561)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21227943?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-02-01 12:27:30
date last changed
2017-09-10 04:43:47
@article{3cc944ba-e368-4f9a-860b-1b7e6a85311b,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is a promising marker of ovarian reserve. The aim of the study is to assess the circadian variation in AMH, and to evaluate its clinical relevance and biological aspects as an effect of age and other endocrine mechanisms involved in the regulation of AMH secretion. METHODS Nineteen healthy non-smoking, regularly menstruating female volunteers with body mass index below 30 kg/m(2), 10 aged 20-30 years (Group A) and 9 aged 35-45 (Group B) were included. Blood sampling, initiated at 8:00 a.m. on Days 2-6 of the menstrual cycle, was continued every second hour until 8:00 a.m. the following day. Serum levels of AMH, FSH, LH, progesterone and estradiol were measured. RESULTS With 8:00 a.m. values at the first day of investigation as a reference, the mean concentrations in the pooled data revealed a significantly lower level at 4:00 a.m. (P = 0.021) and 6:00 a.m. (P = 0.005) with a maximum mean difference of 1.9 pmol/l (10.6%). The same pattern was seen in both the age groups. Including both the age groups, the overall circadian variation of the AMH levels did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.059). A significant positive correlation between AMH and LH concentration was seen over the 24-h period (P &lt; 0.001). CONCLUSIONS A slight decrease in serum AMH levels during the late night appears not clinically relevant. Co-variation in the levels of LH and AMH might indicate joint regulatory mechanisms for the latter hormone and gonadotrophins.},
  author       = {Bungum, Leif and Jacobsson, Anna-Karin and Rosén, Fredrik and Becker, Charlotte and Yding Andersen, Claus and Güner, Nuray and Giwercman, Aleksander},
  issn         = {0268-1161},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {678--684},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Human Reproduction},
  title        = {Circadian variation in concentration of anti-Mullerian hormone in regularly menstruating females: relation to age, gonadotrophin and sex steroid levels.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/humrep/deq380},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2011},
}