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Efficacy of mobile telephone contact for follow-up in injecting heroin users.

Håkansson, Anders C LU ; Isendahl, Pernilla LU ; Wallin, Camilla LU and Berglund, Mats LU (2011) In American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 37(2). p.89-92
Abstract
Background: Prospective follow-up of heroin users is known to be difficult due to their unstable lifestyle, and high follow-up rates have usually demanded major tracking efforts. In Sweden, mobile telephones are commonly used by heavy drug users for drug trading. Objectives: This methodology study aims to examine the efficacy of mobile telephone contact for prospective follow-up interviews with injecting heroin users recruited at the syringe exchange program of Malmö, Sweden. Methods: Seventy-eight heroin users with mobile telephone numbers were included. Subjects reported using heroin for 28 days of the previous 30 days, and only 8% reported they had recently been engaged in work or studies. Clients were contacted between 15 and 21 times... (More)
Background: Prospective follow-up of heroin users is known to be difficult due to their unstable lifestyle, and high follow-up rates have usually demanded major tracking efforts. In Sweden, mobile telephones are commonly used by heavy drug users for drug trading. Objectives: This methodology study aims to examine the efficacy of mobile telephone contact for prospective follow-up interviews with injecting heroin users recruited at the syringe exchange program of Malmö, Sweden. Methods: Seventy-eight heroin users with mobile telephone numbers were included. Subjects reported using heroin for 28 days of the previous 30 days, and only 8% reported they had recently been engaged in work or studies. Clients were contacted between 15 and 21 times over 2 years, with each contact attempt generally involving two telephone calls on consecutive days. Results: During follow-up, 68% of subjects had been successfully contacted for at least one follow-up interview (on average 6.9 interviews), and 25% of follow-up attempts were successful. In 23% of the sample (n = 18), at least 50% of follow-up attempts were successful, and these subjects tended to be older (p = .05) and more likely to be female (p = .07), whereas follow-up rates were unrelated to baseline heroin use. Conclusions: Despite limited effort, and despite the severe situation of intravenous heroin users, mobile telephone contact can be used with heavy drug users in the present setting. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
volume
37
issue
2
pages
89 - 92
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • wos:000287149300003
  • pmid:21189096
  • scopus:79951505940
ISSN
1097-9891
DOI
10.3109/00952990.2010.540277
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f439558b-a4fb-4739-84f7-4f8a322ae712 (old id 1778044)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21189096?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-02-01 09:57:41
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:32:29
@article{f439558b-a4fb-4739-84f7-4f8a322ae712,
  abstract     = {Background: Prospective follow-up of heroin users is known to be difficult due to their unstable lifestyle, and high follow-up rates have usually demanded major tracking efforts. In Sweden, mobile telephones are commonly used by heavy drug users for drug trading. Objectives: This methodology study aims to examine the efficacy of mobile telephone contact for prospective follow-up interviews with injecting heroin users recruited at the syringe exchange program of Malmö, Sweden. Methods: Seventy-eight heroin users with mobile telephone numbers were included. Subjects reported using heroin for 28 days of the previous 30 days, and only 8% reported they had recently been engaged in work or studies. Clients were contacted between 15 and 21 times over 2 years, with each contact attempt generally involving two telephone calls on consecutive days. Results: During follow-up, 68% of subjects had been successfully contacted for at least one follow-up interview (on average 6.9 interviews), and 25% of follow-up attempts were successful. In 23% of the sample (n = 18), at least 50% of follow-up attempts were successful, and these subjects tended to be older (p = .05) and more likely to be female (p = .07), whereas follow-up rates were unrelated to baseline heroin use. Conclusions: Despite limited effort, and despite the severe situation of intravenous heroin users, mobile telephone contact can be used with heavy drug users in the present setting.},
  author       = {Håkansson, Anders C and Isendahl, Pernilla and Wallin, Camilla and Berglund, Mats},
  issn         = {1097-9891},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {89--92},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse},
  title        = {Efficacy of mobile telephone contact for follow-up in injecting heroin users.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00952990.2010.540277},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2011},
}