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Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation of whole wheat in integrated ethanol production

Erdei, Borbala LU ; Galbe, Mats LU and Zacchi, Guido LU (2013) In BIOMASS & BIOENERGY 56. p.506-514
Abstract
Two of the most important ways of reducing the production cost of lignocellulosic ethanol are to increase the ethanol yield and the concentration in the fermentation broth. This can be facilitated by co-fermentation of glucose and xylose from agricultural residues such as wheat straw, due to the high amount of xylose in the hemicelluloses in these materials. Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) of steam-pretreated wheat straw (SPWS) with and without the addition of liquefied wheat meal (LWM) was performed using the pentose-fermenting yeast, TMB3400. The highest overall ethanol yield in batch operation, of around 70%, equivalent to an ethanol concentration of 43.7 g L-1, was achieved using SPWS with 7.5% water-insoluble... (More)
Two of the most important ways of reducing the production cost of lignocellulosic ethanol are to increase the ethanol yield and the concentration in the fermentation broth. This can be facilitated by co-fermentation of glucose and xylose from agricultural residues such as wheat straw, due to the high amount of xylose in the hemicelluloses in these materials. Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) of steam-pretreated wheat straw (SPWS) with and without the addition of liquefied wheat meal (LWM) was performed using the pentose-fermenting yeast, TMB3400. The highest overall ethanol yield in batch operation, of around 70%, equivalent to an ethanol concentration of 43.7 g L-1, was achieved using SPWS with 7.5% water-insoluble solids (WIS) and addition of LWM with 1% WIS. Using SPWS with a higher WIS (10%) resulted in a decreased yield, 60%, although the concentration of ethanol increased to 53.0 g L-1. SSCF of 7.5% straw was also performed with a single (after 20 h) or fed-batch addition of 1% WIS LWM (after 20, 24 and 28 h) resulting in an increase in both ethanol yield and concentration compared to the reference, without wheat meal addition, but no significant difference compared to the batch experiments. The addition of wheat meal to SSCF did not improve xylose utilization significantly, probably due to the instant release of glucose from the liquefied meal, which hampers the uptake of xylose. The instant release of glucose was shown to be caused by the high amylase activity of the beta-glucosidase enzyme preparation. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
SSF, SSCF, Steam pretreated wheat straw, Liquefied wheat meal, Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation, Saccharomyces, cereaisiae TMB3400
in
BIOMASS & BIOENERGY
volume
56
pages
506 - 514
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000323804800055
  • scopus:84880156657
ISSN
1873-2909
DOI
10.1016/j.biombioe.2013.05.032
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
17e32fc4-3386-40eb-a4ef-b35873450f06 (old id 4062324)
date added to LUP
2013-10-22 10:22:21
date last changed
2019-02-20 02:32:11
@article{17e32fc4-3386-40eb-a4ef-b35873450f06,
  abstract     = {Two of the most important ways of reducing the production cost of lignocellulosic ethanol are to increase the ethanol yield and the concentration in the fermentation broth. This can be facilitated by co-fermentation of glucose and xylose from agricultural residues such as wheat straw, due to the high amount of xylose in the hemicelluloses in these materials. Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) of steam-pretreated wheat straw (SPWS) with and without the addition of liquefied wheat meal (LWM) was performed using the pentose-fermenting yeast, TMB3400. The highest overall ethanol yield in batch operation, of around 70%, equivalent to an ethanol concentration of 43.7 g L-1, was achieved using SPWS with 7.5% water-insoluble solids (WIS) and addition of LWM with 1% WIS. Using SPWS with a higher WIS (10%) resulted in a decreased yield, 60%, although the concentration of ethanol increased to 53.0 g L-1. SSCF of 7.5% straw was also performed with a single (after 20 h) or fed-batch addition of 1% WIS LWM (after 20, 24 and 28 h) resulting in an increase in both ethanol yield and concentration compared to the reference, without wheat meal addition, but no significant difference compared to the batch experiments. The addition of wheat meal to SSCF did not improve xylose utilization significantly, probably due to the instant release of glucose from the liquefied meal, which hampers the uptake of xylose. The instant release of glucose was shown to be caused by the high amylase activity of the beta-glucosidase enzyme preparation. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Erdei, Borbala and Galbe, Mats and Zacchi, Guido},
  issn         = {1873-2909},
  keyword      = {SSF,SSCF,Steam pretreated wheat straw,Liquefied wheat meal,Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation,Saccharomyces,cereaisiae TMB3400},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {506--514},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {BIOMASS & BIOENERGY},
  title        = {Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation of whole wheat in integrated ethanol production},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biombioe.2013.05.032},
  volume       = {56},
  year         = {2013},
}