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Health-promoting and health-damaging neighbourhood resources and coronary heart disease: a follow-up study of 2 165 000 people.

Kawakami, Naomi; Li, Xinjun LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2011) In Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 65. p.866-872
Abstract
Background It has been hypothesised that the presence of health-damaging factors and lack of health-promoting factors lie in the causal pathway between neighbourhood deprivation and coronary heart disease (CHD). This study is the first to examine the associations between individual-level CHD risk and neighbourhood availability of fast-food restaurants, bars/pubs, physical activity facilities and healthcare resources. Methods Multilevel logistic regression models were used for the follow-up of 1 065 000 men and 1 100 000 women (aged 35-80 years) between 1 December 2005 and 31 December 2007, for individual-level CHD events (both morbidity and mortality). Results The relatively weak associations between neighbourhood availability... (More)
Background It has been hypothesised that the presence of health-damaging factors and lack of health-promoting factors lie in the causal pathway between neighbourhood deprivation and coronary heart disease (CHD). This study is the first to examine the associations between individual-level CHD risk and neighbourhood availability of fast-food restaurants, bars/pubs, physical activity facilities and healthcare resources. Methods Multilevel logistic regression models were used for the follow-up of 1 065 000 men and 1 100 000 women (aged 35-80 years) between 1 December 2005 and 31 December 2007, for individual-level CHD events (both morbidity and mortality). Results The relatively weak associations between neighbourhood availability of potentially health-damaging and health-promoting goods, services and resources, and CHD incidence no longer remained significant after adjustment for neighbourhood-level deprivation and individual-level age and income. Conclusions The presence of potentially health-damaging factors and lack of potentially health-promoting factors do not seem to contribute significantly to the development of CHD. Other features of deprived neighbourhoods appear to play a greater role. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
volume
65
pages
866 - 872
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000294720300007
  • pmid:21296906
  • scopus:80955134210
ISSN
1470-2738
DOI
10.1136/jech.2010.117580
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
05604e14-20a5-43e2-9508-45d91a7ff0cd (old id 1832242)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21296906?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-03-01 12:48:17
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:55:44
@article{05604e14-20a5-43e2-9508-45d91a7ff0cd,
  abstract     = {Background It has been hypothesised that the presence of health-damaging factors and lack of health-promoting factors lie in the causal pathway between neighbourhood deprivation and coronary heart disease (CHD). This study is the first to examine the associations between individual-level CHD risk and neighbourhood availability of fast-food restaurants, bars/pubs, physical activity facilities and healthcare resources. Methods Multilevel logistic regression models were used for the follow-up of 1 065 000 men and 1 100 000 women (aged 35-80 years) between 1 December 2005 and 31 December 2007, for individual-level CHD events (both morbidity and mortality). Results The relatively weak associations between neighbourhood availability of potentially health-damaging and health-promoting goods, services and resources, and CHD incidence no longer remained significant after adjustment for neighbourhood-level deprivation and individual-level age and income. Conclusions The presence of potentially health-damaging factors and lack of potentially health-promoting factors do not seem to contribute significantly to the development of CHD. Other features of deprived neighbourhoods appear to play a greater role.},
  author       = {Kawakami, Naomi and Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1470-2738},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {866--872},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health},
  title        = {Health-promoting and health-damaging neighbourhood resources and coronary heart disease: a follow-up study of 2 165 000 people.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech.2010.117580},
  volume       = {65},
  year         = {2011},
}