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Self-Serving Cognitive Distortions and Antisocial Behavior Among Adults and Adolescents

Wallinius, Märta LU ; Johansson, Peter; Larden, Martin and Dernevik, Mats (2011) In Criminal Justice and Behavior 38(3). p.286-301
Abstract
The reliability and validity of the self-report questionnaire How I Think (HIT), designed to assess self-serving cognitive distortions related to antisocial behavior, was tested among Swedish offender and nonoffender adults and adolescents (N = 364). The results showed self-serving distortions to be more common among offenders and to predict self-reported antisocial behavior when tested among adults. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed, in contrast to earlier findings, that the underlying structure of the HIT was best explained by a three-factor solution with one major cognitive factor, referred to as "criminal mind." It was concluded that the HIT, after further examination of its structural and divergent validity, could be used as a... (More)
The reliability and validity of the self-report questionnaire How I Think (HIT), designed to assess self-serving cognitive distortions related to antisocial behavior, was tested among Swedish offender and nonoffender adults and adolescents (N = 364). The results showed self-serving distortions to be more common among offenders and to predict self-reported antisocial behavior when tested among adults. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed, in contrast to earlier findings, that the underlying structure of the HIT was best explained by a three-factor solution with one major cognitive factor, referred to as "criminal mind." It was concluded that the HIT, after further examination of its structural and divergent validity, could be used as a measure of criminal thinking in adults as well as in adolescents. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
HIT, self-serving cognitive distortions, antisocial behavior, criminal, attitudes, dynamic risk assessment
in
Criminal Justice and Behavior
volume
38
issue
3
pages
286 - 301
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000286810400005
  • scopus:79551606592
ISSN
0093-8548
DOI
10.1177/0093854810396139
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e36950bb-dbb3-41d7-a63a-f2ef011edf8a (old id 1868531)
date added to LUP
2011-04-19 12:07:29
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:38:47
@article{e36950bb-dbb3-41d7-a63a-f2ef011edf8a,
  abstract     = {The reliability and validity of the self-report questionnaire How I Think (HIT), designed to assess self-serving cognitive distortions related to antisocial behavior, was tested among Swedish offender and nonoffender adults and adolescents (N = 364). The results showed self-serving distortions to be more common among offenders and to predict self-reported antisocial behavior when tested among adults. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed, in contrast to earlier findings, that the underlying structure of the HIT was best explained by a three-factor solution with one major cognitive factor, referred to as "criminal mind." It was concluded that the HIT, after further examination of its structural and divergent validity, could be used as a measure of criminal thinking in adults as well as in adolescents.},
  author       = {Wallinius, Märta and Johansson, Peter and Larden, Martin and Dernevik, Mats},
  issn         = {0093-8548},
  keyword      = {HIT,self-serving cognitive distortions,antisocial behavior,criminal,attitudes,dynamic risk assessment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {286--301},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {Criminal Justice and Behavior},
  title        = {Self-Serving Cognitive Distortions and Antisocial Behavior Among Adults and Adolescents},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0093854810396139},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2011},
}