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Blood lipids in 75,048 type 2 diabetic patients: a population-based survey from the Swedish National diabetes register

Eriksson, Mats; Zethelius, Bjorn; Eeg-Olofsson, Katarina; Nilsson, Peter LU ; Gudbjornsdottir, Soffia; Cederholm, Jan and Eliasson, Bjorn (2011) In European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation 18(1). p.97-105
Abstract
Background: Type 2 diabetes and diabetic dyslipidemia are high-risk conditions for cardiovascular disease. However, the description of the distribution of blood lipids in diabetic patients has not been based on population-based surveys. The aim of this study was to describe diabetic dyslipidemia in a large unselected sample of patients from the Swedish National Diabetes Register. Methods: Blood lipid profiles and clinical characteristics in 75,048 type 2 diabetic patients (57% men) were studied. Results: Pronounced hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides >4.0mmol/l) was seen in 3.4% of the patients. Total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and non-HDL-C were generally higher, and LDL-C/HDL-C and... (More)
Background: Type 2 diabetes and diabetic dyslipidemia are high-risk conditions for cardiovascular disease. However, the description of the distribution of blood lipids in diabetic patients has not been based on population-based surveys. The aim of this study was to describe diabetic dyslipidemia in a large unselected sample of patients from the Swedish National Diabetes Register. Methods: Blood lipid profiles and clinical characteristics in 75,048 type 2 diabetic patients (57% men) were studied. Results: Pronounced hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides >4.0mmol/l) was seen in 3.4% of the patients. Total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and non-HDL-C were generally higher, and LDL-C/HDL-C and Non-HDL-C/HDL-C ratios were lower in women. Mean TC, LDL-C as well as HDL-C values were lower in patients treated with lipid-lowering agents, whereas triglycerides was higher than in the untreated patients. In patients not treated with lipid-lowering agents all blood lipids increased in women and decreased in men (except HDL-C) at higher ages. Patients with LDL-C/HDL-C ratio >= 3 were slightly younger, less frequently used lipid-lowering drugs and had not so often a history of coronary heart disease or stroke. Conclusion: The distribution of blood lipids in this large sample of unselected type 2 diabetic patients challenges the previous conception of diabetic dyslipidemia, and calls for new studies to explain the roles of LDL-C and HDL-C as strong cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Blood lipids, cholesterol, epidemiology, high-density, lipoprotein-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides, type 2 diabetes
in
European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation
volume
18
issue
1
pages
97 - 105
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000287780400011
  • scopus:79955707469
ISSN
1741-8275
DOI
10.1097/HJR.0b013e32833ba61e
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0a99d9a8-c8b0-47c4-94ed-516c5d9834a7 (old id 1876170)
date added to LUP
2011-04-01 12:25:10
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:03:08
@article{0a99d9a8-c8b0-47c4-94ed-516c5d9834a7,
  abstract     = {Background: Type 2 diabetes and diabetic dyslipidemia are high-risk conditions for cardiovascular disease. However, the description of the distribution of blood lipids in diabetic patients has not been based on population-based surveys. The aim of this study was to describe diabetic dyslipidemia in a large unselected sample of patients from the Swedish National Diabetes Register. Methods: Blood lipid profiles and clinical characteristics in 75,048 type 2 diabetic patients (57% men) were studied. Results: Pronounced hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides >4.0mmol/l) was seen in 3.4% of the patients. Total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and non-HDL-C were generally higher, and LDL-C/HDL-C and Non-HDL-C/HDL-C ratios were lower in women. Mean TC, LDL-C as well as HDL-C values were lower in patients treated with lipid-lowering agents, whereas triglycerides was higher than in the untreated patients. In patients not treated with lipid-lowering agents all blood lipids increased in women and decreased in men (except HDL-C) at higher ages. Patients with LDL-C/HDL-C ratio >= 3 were slightly younger, less frequently used lipid-lowering drugs and had not so often a history of coronary heart disease or stroke. Conclusion: The distribution of blood lipids in this large sample of unselected type 2 diabetic patients challenges the previous conception of diabetic dyslipidemia, and calls for new studies to explain the roles of LDL-C and HDL-C as strong cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes.},
  author       = {Eriksson, Mats and Zethelius, Bjorn and Eeg-Olofsson, Katarina and Nilsson, Peter and Gudbjornsdottir, Soffia and Cederholm, Jan and Eliasson, Bjorn},
  issn         = {1741-8275},
  keyword      = {Blood lipids,cholesterol,epidemiology,high-density,lipoprotein-cholesterol,low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol,triglycerides,type 2 diabetes},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {97--105},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Blood lipids in 75,048 type 2 diabetic patients: a population-based survey from the Swedish National diabetes register},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJR.0b013e32833ba61e},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2011},
}