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Effectiveness of Population-Based Service Screening With Mammography for Women Ages 40 to 49 Years Evaluation of the Swedish Mammography Screening in Young Women (SCRY) Cohort

Hellquist, Barbro Numan; Duffy, Stephen W.; Abdsaleh, Shahin; Bjorneld, Lena; Bordas, Pal; Tabar, Laszlo; Vitak, Bedrich; Zackrisson, Sophia LU ; Nystrom, Lennarth and Jonsson, Hakan (2011) In Cancer 117(4). p.714-722
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of mammography screening for women ages 40 to 49 years still is questioned, and few studies of the effectiveness of service screening for this age group have been conducted. METHODS: Breast cancer mortality was compared between women who were invited to service screening at ages 40 to 49 years (study group) and women in the same age group who were not invited during 1986 to 2005 (control group). Together, these women comprise the Mammography Screening of Young Women (SCRY) cohort, which includes all Swedish counties. A prescreening period was defined to facilitate a comparison of mortality in the absence of screening. The outcome measure was refined mortality, ie, breast cancer death for women who were... (More)
BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of mammography screening for women ages 40 to 49 years still is questioned, and few studies of the effectiveness of service screening for this age group have been conducted. METHODS: Breast cancer mortality was compared between women who were invited to service screening at ages 40 to 49 years (study group) and women in the same age group who were not invited during 1986 to 2005 (control group). Together, these women comprise the Mammography Screening of Young Women (SCRY) cohort, which includes all Swedish counties. A prescreening period was defined to facilitate a comparison of mortality in the absence of screening. The outcome measure was refined mortality, ie, breast cancer death for women who were diagnosed during follow-up at ages 40 to 49 years. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (Os) were estimated. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in breast cancer mortality during the prescreening period. During the study period, there were 803 breast cancer deaths in the study group (7.3 million person-years) and 1238 breast cancer deaths in the control group (8.8 million person-years). The average follow-up was 16 years. The estimated RR for women who were invited to screening was 0.74 (95% Cl, 0.66-0.83), and the RR for women who attended screening was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.620.80). CONCLUSIONS: In this comprehensive study, mammography screening for women ages 40 to 49 years was efficient for reducing breast cancer mortality. Cancer 2011;117:714-22. (C) 2010 American Cancer Society. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
mammography, screening, breast cancer, mortality
in
Cancer
volume
117
issue
4
pages
714 - 722
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000286966500009
  • scopus:79551718990
ISSN
1097-0142
DOI
10.1002/cncr.25650
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7b57f5f5-e0c2-4ad8-8c11-9b742c36ae12 (old id 1876357)
date added to LUP
2011-04-01 12:04:22
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:13:15
@article{7b57f5f5-e0c2-4ad8-8c11-9b742c36ae12,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of mammography screening for women ages 40 to 49 years still is questioned, and few studies of the effectiveness of service screening for this age group have been conducted. METHODS: Breast cancer mortality was compared between women who were invited to service screening at ages 40 to 49 years (study group) and women in the same age group who were not invited during 1986 to 2005 (control group). Together, these women comprise the Mammography Screening of Young Women (SCRY) cohort, which includes all Swedish counties. A prescreening period was defined to facilitate a comparison of mortality in the absence of screening. The outcome measure was refined mortality, ie, breast cancer death for women who were diagnosed during follow-up at ages 40 to 49 years. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (Os) were estimated. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in breast cancer mortality during the prescreening period. During the study period, there were 803 breast cancer deaths in the study group (7.3 million person-years) and 1238 breast cancer deaths in the control group (8.8 million person-years). The average follow-up was 16 years. The estimated RR for women who were invited to screening was 0.74 (95% Cl, 0.66-0.83), and the RR for women who attended screening was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.620.80). CONCLUSIONS: In this comprehensive study, mammography screening for women ages 40 to 49 years was efficient for reducing breast cancer mortality. Cancer 2011;117:714-22. (C) 2010 American Cancer Society.},
  author       = {Hellquist, Barbro Numan and Duffy, Stephen W. and Abdsaleh, Shahin and Bjorneld, Lena and Bordas, Pal and Tabar, Laszlo and Vitak, Bedrich and Zackrisson, Sophia and Nystrom, Lennarth and Jonsson, Hakan},
  issn         = {1097-0142},
  keyword      = {mammography,screening,breast cancer,mortality},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {714--722},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Cancer},
  title        = {Effectiveness of Population-Based Service Screening With Mammography for Women Ages 40 to 49 Years Evaluation of the Swedish Mammography Screening in Young Women (SCRY) Cohort},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.25650},
  volume       = {117},
  year         = {2011},
}