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Agreement Between Fasting and Postprandial LDL Cholesterol Measured with 3 Methods in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Lund, Soren S.; Petersen, Martin; Frandsen, Merete; Smidt, Ulla M.; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Vaag, Allan LU and Jensen, Tonny (2011) In Clinical Chemistry 57(2). p.298-308
Abstract
BACKGROUND: LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) is a modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factor. We used 3 LDL-C methods to study the agreement between fasting and postprandial LDL-C in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. METHODS: We served 74 T2DM patients a standardized meal and sampled blood at fasting and 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, and 6.0 h postprandially. We measured LDL-C by use of modified beta quantification (MBQ), the Friedewald equation (FE), and a direct homogeneous assay (DA). We evaluated agreement using 95% limits of agreement (LOA) within +/- 0.20 mmol/L (+/- 7.7 mg/dL). RESULTS: LDL-C concentrations at all postprandial times disagreed with those at fasting for all methods. In 66 patients who had complete measurements with all LDL-C methods,... (More)
BACKGROUND: LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) is a modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factor. We used 3 LDL-C methods to study the agreement between fasting and postprandial LDL-C in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. METHODS: We served 74 T2DM patients a standardized meal and sampled blood at fasting and 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, and 6.0 h postprandially. We measured LDL-C by use of modified beta quantification (MBQ), the Friedewald equation (FE), and a direct homogeneous assay (DA). We evaluated agreement using 95% limits of agreement (LOA) within +/- 0.20 mmol/L (+/- 7.7 mg/dL). RESULTS: LDL-C concentrations at all postprandial times disagreed with those at fasting for all methods. In 66 patients who had complete measurements with all LDL-C methods, maximum mean differences (95% LOA) in postprandial vs fasting LDL-C were -0.16 mmol/L (-0.51; 0.19) [-6.2 mg/dL (-19.7; 7.3)] with MBQ at 3 h; -0.36 mmol/L (-0.89; 0.17) [-13.9 mg/dL (-34; 6.6)] with FE at 4.5 h; and -0.24 mmol/L (-0.62; 0.05) [-9.3 mg/dL (-24; 1.9)] with DA at 6.0 h. In postprandial samples, FE misclassified 38% of patients (two-thirds of statin users) into lower Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) risk categories. Greater disagreement between fasting and postprandial LDL-C was observed in individuals with postprandial triglyceride concentrations >2.08 mmol/L (>184 mg/dL) and in women (interactions: P <= 0.038). CONCLUSIONS: Differences up to 0.89 mmol/L (34 mg/dL) between fasting and postprandial LDL-C concentrations, with postprandial LDL-C concentrations usually being lower, were found in T2DM by 3 different LDL-C methods. Such differences are potentially relevant clinically and suggest that, irrespective of measurement method, postprandial LDL-C concentrations should not be used to assess cardiovascular disease risk. (C) 2010 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Chemistry
volume
57
issue
2
pages
298 - 308
publisher
American Association for Clinical Chemistry
external identifiers
  • wos:000286653000025
  • scopus:79551562610
ISSN
0009-9147
DOI
10.1373/clinchem.2009.133868
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
39f10abb-b6fb-41db-9369-929c47061f4f (old id 1882653)
date added to LUP
2011-04-01 08:40:46
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:09:49
@article{39f10abb-b6fb-41db-9369-929c47061f4f,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) is a modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factor. We used 3 LDL-C methods to study the agreement between fasting and postprandial LDL-C in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. METHODS: We served 74 T2DM patients a standardized meal and sampled blood at fasting and 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, and 6.0 h postprandially. We measured LDL-C by use of modified beta quantification (MBQ), the Friedewald equation (FE), and a direct homogeneous assay (DA). We evaluated agreement using 95% limits of agreement (LOA) within +/- 0.20 mmol/L (+/- 7.7 mg/dL). RESULTS: LDL-C concentrations at all postprandial times disagreed with those at fasting for all methods. In 66 patients who had complete measurements with all LDL-C methods, maximum mean differences (95% LOA) in postprandial vs fasting LDL-C were -0.16 mmol/L (-0.51; 0.19) [-6.2 mg/dL (-19.7; 7.3)] with MBQ at 3 h; -0.36 mmol/L (-0.89; 0.17) [-13.9 mg/dL (-34; 6.6)] with FE at 4.5 h; and -0.24 mmol/L (-0.62; 0.05) [-9.3 mg/dL (-24; 1.9)] with DA at 6.0 h. In postprandial samples, FE misclassified 38% of patients (two-thirds of statin users) into lower Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) risk categories. Greater disagreement between fasting and postprandial LDL-C was observed in individuals with postprandial triglyceride concentrations &gt;2.08 mmol/L (&gt;184 mg/dL) and in women (interactions: P &lt;= 0.038). CONCLUSIONS: Differences up to 0.89 mmol/L (34 mg/dL) between fasting and postprandial LDL-C concentrations, with postprandial LDL-C concentrations usually being lower, were found in T2DM by 3 different LDL-C methods. Such differences are potentially relevant clinically and suggest that, irrespective of measurement method, postprandial LDL-C concentrations should not be used to assess cardiovascular disease risk. (C) 2010 American Association for Clinical Chemistry},
  author       = {Lund, Soren S. and Petersen, Martin and Frandsen, Merete and Smidt, Ulla M. and Parving, Hans-Henrik and Vaag, Allan and Jensen, Tonny},
  issn         = {0009-9147},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {298--308},
  publisher    = {American Association for Clinical Chemistry},
  series       = {Clinical Chemistry},
  title        = {Agreement Between Fasting and Postprandial LDL Cholesterol Measured with 3 Methods in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1373/clinchem.2009.133868},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2011},
}