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Better Walking Performance in Older Children With Cerebral Palsy.

Rodby Bousquet, Elisabet LU and Hägglund, Gunnar LU (2012) In Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 470. p.1286-1293
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often walk with a slower speed and a higher energy cost. Their walking performance and choice of mobility method may vary in different environments. Independent mobility is important for activity and participation. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: We described walking performance at different distances and environments in relation to gross motor function, CP subtype, and age. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study including all 562 children 3 to 18 years with CP living in southern Sweden during 2008. Data were extracted from a Swedish CP register and healthcare program. The Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) was used for rating mobility at home (5 m), at school (50 m), and in the community... (More)
BACKGROUND: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often walk with a slower speed and a higher energy cost. Their walking performance and choice of mobility method may vary in different environments. Independent mobility is important for activity and participation. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: We described walking performance at different distances and environments in relation to gross motor function, CP subtype, and age. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study including all 562 children 3 to 18 years with CP living in southern Sweden during 2008. Data were extracted from a Swedish CP register and healthcare program. The Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) was used for rating mobility at home (5 m), at school (50 m), and in the community (500 m). The FMS scores were analyzed in relation to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level, CP subtype, and age. RESULTS: In this population, 57% to 63% walked 5 to 500 m without walking aids and 4% to 8% used walking aids. We found a correlation between FMS and GMFCS. The walking performance varied between the subtypes from 96% to 98% in those with spastic unilateral CP to 16% to 24% in children with dyskinetic CP. An increased proportion of children walked independently on all surfaces in each successive age group. CONCLUSIONS: The overall walking performance increased up to 7 years of age, but the proportion of children walking independently on uneven surfaces was incrementally higher in each age group up to 18 years. The ability to walk on uneven surfaces is important for achieving independent walking in the community. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
volume
470
pages
1286 - 1293
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000304094400007
  • pmid:21445713
  • scopus:84859863550
ISSN
0009-921X
DOI
10.1007/s11999-011-1860-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b24ac827-d665-4afc-819c-01f505aaf59b (old id 1883339)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21445713?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-04-01 22:32:06
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:41:28
@article{b24ac827-d665-4afc-819c-01f505aaf59b,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often walk with a slower speed and a higher energy cost. Their walking performance and choice of mobility method may vary in different environments. Independent mobility is important for activity and participation. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: We described walking performance at different distances and environments in relation to gross motor function, CP subtype, and age. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study including all 562 children 3 to 18 years with CP living in southern Sweden during 2008. Data were extracted from a Swedish CP register and healthcare program. The Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) was used for rating mobility at home (5 m), at school (50 m), and in the community (500 m). The FMS scores were analyzed in relation to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level, CP subtype, and age. RESULTS: In this population, 57% to 63% walked 5 to 500 m without walking aids and 4% to 8% used walking aids. We found a correlation between FMS and GMFCS. The walking performance varied between the subtypes from 96% to 98% in those with spastic unilateral CP to 16% to 24% in children with dyskinetic CP. An increased proportion of children walked independently on all surfaces in each successive age group. CONCLUSIONS: The overall walking performance increased up to 7 years of age, but the proportion of children walking independently on uneven surfaces was incrementally higher in each age group up to 18 years. The ability to walk on uneven surfaces is important for achieving independent walking in the community.},
  author       = {Rodby Bousquet, Elisabet and Hägglund, Gunnar},
  issn         = {0009-921X},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1286--1293},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research},
  title        = {Better Walking Performance in Older Children With Cerebral Palsy.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11999-011-1860-8},
  volume       = {470},
  year         = {2012},
}