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Recording of Psychophysiological Data During Aerobatic Training

Dahlström, Nicklas LU ; Nahlinder, Staffan; Wilson, Glenn F. and Svensson, Erland (2011) In International Journal of Aviation Psychology 21(2). p.105-122
Abstract
Measuring pilot mental workload can be important for understanding cognitive demands during flight involving unusual movements and attitudes. Data on heart rate, eye movements, EEG, and subjective ratings from 7 flight instructors were collected for a flight including a repeated aerobatics sequence. Heart rate data and subjective ratings showed that aerobatic sequences produced the highest levels of mental workload and that heart rate can identify low-G flight segments with high mental workload. Blink rate and eye movement data did not support previous research regarding their relation to mental workload. EEG data were difficult to analyze due to muscle artifacts.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Aviation Psychology
volume
21
issue
2
pages
105 - 122
publisher
Taylor & Francis Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000289250800001
  • scopus:79953741493
ISSN
1050-8414
DOI
10.1080/10508414.2011.556443
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
df8f4169-9147-4c48-9c13-3acf5989dea4 (old id 1918478)
date added to LUP
2011-05-12 08:35:01
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:16:38
@article{df8f4169-9147-4c48-9c13-3acf5989dea4,
  abstract     = {Measuring pilot mental workload can be important for understanding cognitive demands during flight involving unusual movements and attitudes. Data on heart rate, eye movements, EEG, and subjective ratings from 7 flight instructors were collected for a flight including a repeated aerobatics sequence. Heart rate data and subjective ratings showed that aerobatic sequences produced the highest levels of mental workload and that heart rate can identify low-G flight segments with high mental workload. Blink rate and eye movement data did not support previous research regarding their relation to mental workload. EEG data were difficult to analyze due to muscle artifacts.},
  author       = {Dahlström, Nicklas and Nahlinder, Staffan and Wilson, Glenn F. and Svensson, Erland},
  issn         = {1050-8414},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {105--122},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis Inc.},
  series       = {International Journal of Aviation Psychology},
  title        = {Recording of Psychophysiological Data During Aerobatic Training},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10508414.2011.556443},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2011},
}