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Autoignition quality of gasoline fuels in partially premixed combustion in diesel engines

Kalghatgi, G. T.; Hildingsson, Leif LU ; Harrison, A. J. and Johansson, Bengt LU (2011) In Proceedings of the Combustion Institute 33. p.3015-3021
Abstract
A single-cylinder diesel engine has been run on gasolines of different octane numbers and on model fuels, mixtures of iso-octane, n-heptane and toluene, at different operating conditions. The autoignition quality of the fuel is best described by an Octane Index, OI = (1 - K) . RON + K . MON for fuels in the gasoline autoignition range where RON and MON are, respectively, the Research and Motor Octane numbers and K is an empirical constant which is measured to be negative. Hence for a given RON, a non-paraffinic fuel, of lower MON, will have higher OI and more resistance to autoignition. For a given operating condition, ignition delay increases non-linearly with OI and changes little over the autoignition range of practical diesel fuels.... (More)
A single-cylinder diesel engine has been run on gasolines of different octane numbers and on model fuels, mixtures of iso-octane, n-heptane and toluene, at different operating conditions. The autoignition quality of the fuel is best described by an Octane Index, OI = (1 - K) . RON + K . MON for fuels in the gasoline autoignition range where RON and MON are, respectively, the Research and Motor Octane numbers and K is an empirical constant which is measured to be negative. Hence for a given RON, a non-paraffinic fuel, of lower MON, will have higher OI and more resistance to autoignition. For a given operating condition, ignition delay increases non-linearly with OI and changes little over the autoignition range of practical diesel fuels. Heat release following the autoignition is influenced by the stratification which will increase as the time between the end of injection and start of combustion decreases and combustion phasing parameters such as Combustion Delay, the difference between the 50% burn time and the start of injection, become less correlated with fuel autoignition quality. Higher ignition delays facilitate premixed combustion in the diesel engine. If two fuels have similar combustion phasing at the same injection timing, their emissions performance is also similar. Hence a good surrogate for gasoline in partially premixed compression ignition engines is a mixture of toluene, iso-octane and n-heptane with the same RON and MON. (C) 2010 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
CI engines, Gasoline, Autoignition, Octane Index, Reference fuel
in
Proceedings of the Combustion Institute
volume
33
pages
3015 - 3021
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000285629000157
  • scopus:79251615423
ISSN
1540-7489
DOI
10.1016/j.proci.2010.07.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2ae64d7c-8b57-42b7-9ce2-eb48918a40b6 (old id 1926430)
date added to LUP
2011-05-10 11:17:54
date last changed
2017-04-30 05:39:45
@article{2ae64d7c-8b57-42b7-9ce2-eb48918a40b6,
  abstract     = {A single-cylinder diesel engine has been run on gasolines of different octane numbers and on model fuels, mixtures of iso-octane, n-heptane and toluene, at different operating conditions. The autoignition quality of the fuel is best described by an Octane Index, OI = (1 - K) . RON + K . MON for fuels in the gasoline autoignition range where RON and MON are, respectively, the Research and Motor Octane numbers and K is an empirical constant which is measured to be negative. Hence for a given RON, a non-paraffinic fuel, of lower MON, will have higher OI and more resistance to autoignition. For a given operating condition, ignition delay increases non-linearly with OI and changes little over the autoignition range of practical diesel fuels. Heat release following the autoignition is influenced by the stratification which will increase as the time between the end of injection and start of combustion decreases and combustion phasing parameters such as Combustion Delay, the difference between the 50% burn time and the start of injection, become less correlated with fuel autoignition quality. Higher ignition delays facilitate premixed combustion in the diesel engine. If two fuels have similar combustion phasing at the same injection timing, their emissions performance is also similar. Hence a good surrogate for gasoline in partially premixed compression ignition engines is a mixture of toluene, iso-octane and n-heptane with the same RON and MON. (C) 2010 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Kalghatgi, G. T. and Hildingsson, Leif and Harrison, A. J. and Johansson, Bengt},
  issn         = {1540-7489},
  keyword      = {CI engines,Gasoline,Autoignition,Octane Index,Reference fuel},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {3015--3021},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Proceedings of the Combustion Institute},
  title        = {Autoignition quality of gasoline fuels in partially premixed combustion in diesel engines},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.proci.2010.07.007},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2011},
}