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Fast Fourier Methods for Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

Andersson, Fredrik LU ; Moses, Randolph and Natterer, Frank (2012) In IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems 48(1). p.215-229
Abstract
In synthetic aperture radar one wishes to reconstruct the reflectivity function of a region on the ground from a set of radar measurements taken at several angles. The ground reflectivity is found by interpolating measured samples, which typically lie on a polar grid in frequency space, to an equally spaced rectangular grid in frequency space, then computing an inverse Fourier transform. The classical Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) is often used to perform this interpolation. In this paper we describe two other methods for performing the interpolation and imaging efficiently and accurately. The first is the Gridding Method, which is widely used in the medical imaging community. The second method uses unequally spaced FFTs, a generic tool for... (More)
In synthetic aperture radar one wishes to reconstruct the reflectivity function of a region on the ground from a set of radar measurements taken at several angles. The ground reflectivity is found by interpolating measured samples, which typically lie on a polar grid in frequency space, to an equally spaced rectangular grid in frequency space, then computing an inverse Fourier transform. The classical Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) is often used to perform this interpolation. In this paper we describe two other methods for performing the interpolation and imaging efficiently and accurately. The first is the Gridding Method, which is widely used in the medical imaging community. The second method uses unequally spaced FFTs, a generic tool for arbitrary sampling geometries. We present numerical and computational comparisons of these three methods using both point scattering data and synthetic X-band radar reflectivity predictions of a construction backhoe. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems
volume
48
issue
1
pages
215 - 229
publisher
IEEE--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000302643100016
  • scopus:84856143642
ISSN
0018-9251
DOI
10.1109/TAES.2012.6129631
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e195f005-72b9-436b-a049-6d173036ca8b (old id 1963289)
date added to LUP
2011-05-19 20:05:40
date last changed
2017-09-03 03:25:58
@article{e195f005-72b9-436b-a049-6d173036ca8b,
  abstract     = {In synthetic aperture radar one wishes to reconstruct the reflectivity function of a region on the ground from a set of radar measurements taken at several angles. The ground reflectivity is found by interpolating measured samples, which typically lie on a polar grid in frequency space, to an equally spaced rectangular grid in frequency space, then computing an inverse Fourier transform. The classical Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) is often used to perform this interpolation. In this paper we describe two other methods for performing the interpolation and imaging efficiently and accurately. The first is the Gridding Method, which is widely used in the medical imaging community. The second method uses unequally spaced FFTs, a generic tool for arbitrary sampling geometries. We present numerical and computational comparisons of these three methods using both point scattering data and synthetic X-band radar reflectivity predictions of a construction backhoe.},
  author       = {Andersson, Fredrik and Moses, Randolph and Natterer, Frank},
  issn         = {0018-9251},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {215--229},
  publisher    = {IEEE--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.},
  series       = {IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems},
  title        = {Fast Fourier Methods for Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TAES.2012.6129631},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2012},
}