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Do risk factors for schizophrenia predispose to emigration?

Pedersen, Carsten Bocker; Mortensen, Preben Bo and Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth LU (2011) In Schizophrenia Research 127(1-3). p.229-234
Abstract
Objective: Increased incidence rates of schizophrenia in immigrants still lack a satisfactory explanation. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that risk factors for schizophrenia also increase the risk of emigration to a foreign country. If valid, Danes emigrating from Denmark carry a higher predisposition to develop schizophrenia compared to Danes living in Denmark. Methods: Utilizing data from the Danish Civil Registration System, we established a population-based cohort of 1.10 million native Danes. We assessed relative risks of emigration to a foreign country in relation to sex, age, urban birth, parental age, and a history of mental illness. Results: Urban birth in Denmark was a significant predictor of emigration to a... (More)
Objective: Increased incidence rates of schizophrenia in immigrants still lack a satisfactory explanation. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that risk factors for schizophrenia also increase the risk of emigration to a foreign country. If valid, Danes emigrating from Denmark carry a higher predisposition to develop schizophrenia compared to Danes living in Denmark. Methods: Utilizing data from the Danish Civil Registration System, we established a population-based cohort of 1.10 million native Danes. We assessed relative risks of emigration to a foreign country in relation to sex, age, urban birth, parental age, and a history of mental illness. Results: Urban birth in Denmark was a significant predictor of emigration to a foreign country. A maternal history of psychiatric contact during childhood and a parental history of bipolar affective disorder increased the risks of emigration. A personal history of mental illness decreased the risk of emigration, mostly for people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Conclusions: Our study provided evidence that Danish emigrants residing in a foreign country have both a higher predisposition of schizophrenia due to differential exposure to birth in urban areas and a lower predisposition of schizophrenia due to differential exposure to a history of mental illness. Although competing selection mechanisms operate, the combined effect of these different selection mechanisms was limited, thus suggesting a potential role for yet to be identified adverse environmental effects operating either before or after emigration. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Schizophrenia, Bipolar affective disorder, Emigration, Denmark, Epidemiology, Risk factor
in
Schizophrenia Research
volume
127
issue
1-3
pages
229 - 234
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000289395100035
  • scopus:79952314488
ISSN
0920-9964
DOI
10.1016/j.schres.2011.01.013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
23e6127c-b8bb-4d08-8a63-b72e3997796a (old id 1964785)
date added to LUP
2011-05-23 13:41:17
date last changed
2017-07-23 03:31:27
@article{23e6127c-b8bb-4d08-8a63-b72e3997796a,
  abstract     = {Objective: Increased incidence rates of schizophrenia in immigrants still lack a satisfactory explanation. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that risk factors for schizophrenia also increase the risk of emigration to a foreign country. If valid, Danes emigrating from Denmark carry a higher predisposition to develop schizophrenia compared to Danes living in Denmark. Methods: Utilizing data from the Danish Civil Registration System, we established a population-based cohort of 1.10 million native Danes. We assessed relative risks of emigration to a foreign country in relation to sex, age, urban birth, parental age, and a history of mental illness. Results: Urban birth in Denmark was a significant predictor of emigration to a foreign country. A maternal history of psychiatric contact during childhood and a parental history of bipolar affective disorder increased the risks of emigration. A personal history of mental illness decreased the risk of emigration, mostly for people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Conclusions: Our study provided evidence that Danish emigrants residing in a foreign country have both a higher predisposition of schizophrenia due to differential exposure to birth in urban areas and a lower predisposition of schizophrenia due to differential exposure to a history of mental illness. Although competing selection mechanisms operate, the combined effect of these different selection mechanisms was limited, thus suggesting a potential role for yet to be identified adverse environmental effects operating either before or after emigration. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Pedersen, Carsten Bocker and Mortensen, Preben Bo and Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth},
  issn         = {0920-9964},
  keyword      = {Schizophrenia,Bipolar affective disorder,Emigration,Denmark,Epidemiology,Risk factor},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-3},
  pages        = {229--234},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Schizophrenia Research},
  title        = {Do risk factors for schizophrenia predispose to emigration?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2011.01.013},
  volume       = {127},
  year         = {2011},
}