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Size heterogeneity, growth potential and aggression in juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi Valenciennes)

Moran, Damian LU (2007) In Aquaculture Research 38(12). p.1254-1264
Abstract
The ontogenetic development of size heterogeneity and aggression was monitored in commercial culture tanks of yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi Valenciennes). Size heterogeneity increased substantially with the introduction of Artemia as a food source at 12 days post-hatch (DPH), and was correlated with the appearance of aiming behaviour, a precursor to more direct aggressive interactions. Chasing behaviour started at approximately 19 DPH (10-12 mm total length), with the main aggressors being large-grade individuals comprising 8% of the population. At any one time, only 10-30% of this grade carried out all of the chases, meaning that a very small proportion of the entire population (1%) was responsible for most of the aggressive... (More)
The ontogenetic development of size heterogeneity and aggression was monitored in commercial culture tanks of yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi Valenciennes). Size heterogeneity increased substantially with the introduction of Artemia as a food source at 12 days post-hatch (DPH), and was correlated with the appearance of aiming behaviour, a precursor to more direct aggressive interactions. Chasing behaviour started at approximately 19 DPH (10-12 mm total length), with the main aggressors being large-grade individuals comprising 8% of the population. At any one time, only 10-30% of this grade carried out all of the chases, meaning that a very small proportion of the entire population (1%) was responsible for most of the aggressive interactions. The main recipients of aggression were the small grade, comprising 42% of the population, while the medium grade (50% of the population) were generally not aggressive and received only a low to moderate level of aggression. A grading trial showed that large-grade juveniles only displayed aggressive behaviour in the presence of size heterogeneity, and that medium- or small-grade juveniles did not establish an agonistic hierarchy in the absence of large individuals. A high level of aggression in the ungraded control treatment was associated with mortality of most of the small individuals. Even in the absence of aggression, the small-grade juveniles failed to gain weight or show an increase in the RNA/DNA ratio after 12 days. The large- and medium-grade larvae showed an isometric increase in RNA/DNA ratio during development, indicating that faster-growing individuals are likely the result of better food capture or processing traits rather than better protein synthesis rates. Decreasing size heterogeneity and aggression via grading mostly benefits the medium-grade individuals, as the majority of small individuals within a batch appear to be on a degenerative developmental trajectory irrespective of an aggressive environment. 15-20 individuals measured for total length or weight (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
aggression, size heterogeneity, growth, RNA/DNA ratio
in
Aquaculture Research
volume
38
issue
12
pages
1254 - 1264
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:34548317508
ISSN
1365-2109
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2109.2007.01769.x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
63cf1659-6beb-4013-944e-922945e920a9 (old id 1981405)
alternative location
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2109.2007.01769.x
date added to LUP
2011-06-22 13:02:18
date last changed
2017-02-26 03:37:56
@article{63cf1659-6beb-4013-944e-922945e920a9,
  abstract     = {The ontogenetic development of size heterogeneity and aggression was monitored in commercial culture tanks of yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi Valenciennes). Size heterogeneity increased substantially with the introduction of Artemia as a food source at 12 days post-hatch (DPH), and was correlated with the appearance of aiming behaviour, a precursor to more direct aggressive interactions. Chasing behaviour started at approximately 19 DPH (10-12 mm total length), with the main aggressors being large-grade individuals comprising 8% of the population. At any one time, only 10-30% of this grade carried out all of the chases, meaning that a very small proportion of the entire population (1%) was responsible for most of the aggressive interactions. The main recipients of aggression were the small grade, comprising 42% of the population, while the medium grade (50% of the population) were generally not aggressive and received only a low to moderate level of aggression. A grading trial showed that large-grade juveniles only displayed aggressive behaviour in the presence of size heterogeneity, and that medium- or small-grade juveniles did not establish an agonistic hierarchy in the absence of large individuals. A high level of aggression in the ungraded control treatment was associated with mortality of most of the small individuals. Even in the absence of aggression, the small-grade juveniles failed to gain weight or show an increase in the RNA/DNA ratio after 12 days. The large- and medium-grade larvae showed an isometric increase in RNA/DNA ratio during development, indicating that faster-growing individuals are likely the result of better food capture or processing traits rather than better protein synthesis rates. Decreasing size heterogeneity and aggression via grading mostly benefits the medium-grade individuals, as the majority of small individuals within a batch appear to be on a degenerative developmental trajectory irrespective of an aggressive environment. 15-20 individuals measured for total length or weight},
  author       = {Moran, Damian},
  issn         = {1365-2109},
  keyword      = {aggression,size heterogeneity,growth,RNA/DNA ratio},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1254--1264},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Aquaculture Research},
  title        = {Size heterogeneity, growth potential and aggression in juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi Valenciennes)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2109.2007.01769.x},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2007},
}