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Low stress response exhibited by juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi Valenciennes) exposed to hypercapnic conditions associated with transportation

Moran, Damian LU ; Wells, R.M.G and Pether, S.J (2008) In Aquaculture Research 39(13). p.1399-1407
Abstract
Transportation of yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi Valenciennes) juveniles from hatchery to on-growing operations in New Zealand exposes the fish to significantly elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. Experiments were undertaken to assess metabolic and haematological stress responses after a 5 h period of hypercapnia followed by recovery in normocapnia. Mortality was low (0.5%) and secondary stress indices (blood glucose, blood lactate, muscle pH and muscle lactate) were largely unchanged during a simulated transportation and recovery, despite juveniles being exposed to CO2 concentrations as high as 75 mg CO2 L-1 (38 mm Hg partial pressure). There was some haematological disturbance midway through simulated transports where... (More)
Transportation of yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi Valenciennes) juveniles from hatchery to on-growing operations in New Zealand exposes the fish to significantly elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. Experiments were undertaken to assess metabolic and haematological stress responses after a 5 h period of hypercapnia followed by recovery in normocapnia. Mortality was low (0.5%) and secondary stress indices (blood glucose, blood lactate, muscle pH and muscle lactate) were largely unchanged during a simulated transportation and recovery, despite juveniles being exposed to CO2 concentrations as high as 75 mg CO2 L-1 (38 mm Hg partial pressure). There was some haematological disturbance midway through simulated transports where water was maintained at fixed CO2 concentrations of 8 and 50 mg CO2 L-1 (4 and 26 mm Hg, respectively). Persistent erythrocyte swelling continued during transport at 50 mg CO2 L-1, whereas at 8 mg CO2 L-1 haematological variables had returned to control levels. There was no mortality recorded for any of the treatments and haematological variables were restored to pre-manipulation levels after 31 h. The results indicated that juvenile yellowtail kingfish have a robust physiology and can cope with the stressors imposed by acute exposure to moderate to high levels of CO2 associated with live transport. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
lactate, carbon dioxide, haematology, welfare, blood glucose, Hypercapnia, live transport, stress
in
Aquaculture Research
volume
39
issue
13
pages
1399 - 1407
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:52049090819
ISSN
1365-2109
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2109.2008.02009.x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
56334354-48e9-4c2a-a40f-14082ff84488 (old id 1981448)
date added to LUP
2011-06-21 16:39:03
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:47:21
@article{56334354-48e9-4c2a-a40f-14082ff84488,
  abstract     = {Transportation of yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi Valenciennes) juveniles from hatchery to on-growing operations in New Zealand exposes the fish to significantly elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. Experiments were undertaken to assess metabolic and haematological stress responses after a 5 h period of hypercapnia followed by recovery in normocapnia. Mortality was low (0.5%) and secondary stress indices (blood glucose, blood lactate, muscle pH and muscle lactate) were largely unchanged during a simulated transportation and recovery, despite juveniles being exposed to CO2 concentrations as high as 75 mg CO2 L-1 (38 mm Hg partial pressure). There was some haematological disturbance midway through simulated transports where water was maintained at fixed CO2 concentrations of 8 and 50 mg CO2 L-1 (4 and 26 mm Hg, respectively). Persistent erythrocyte swelling continued during transport at 50 mg CO2 L-1, whereas at 8 mg CO2 L-1 haematological variables had returned to control levels. There was no mortality recorded for any of the treatments and haematological variables were restored to pre-manipulation levels after 31 h. The results indicated that juvenile yellowtail kingfish have a robust physiology and can cope with the stressors imposed by acute exposure to moderate to high levels of CO2 associated with live transport.},
  author       = {Moran, Damian and Wells, R.M.G and Pether, S.J},
  issn         = {1365-2109},
  keyword      = {lactate,carbon dioxide,haematology,welfare,blood glucose,Hypercapnia,live transport,stress},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {13},
  pages        = {1399--1407},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Aquaculture Research},
  title        = {Low stress response exhibited by juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi Valenciennes) exposed to hypercapnic conditions associated with transportation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2109.2008.02009.x},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2008},
}