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Cerebrospinal Fluid Microglial Markers in Alzheimer's Disease: Elevated Chitotriosidase Activity but Lack of Diagnostic Utility

Mattsson, Niklas; Tabatabaei, Shahrzad; Johansson, Per LU ; Hansson, Oskar LU ; Andreasson, Ulf; Mansson, Jan-Eric; Johansson, Jan-Ove; Olsson, Bob; Wallin, Anders and Svensson, Johan, et al. (2011) In NeuroMolecular Medicine 13(2). p.151-159
Abstract
Activated microglial cells, which are the resident macrophages of the central nervous system, surround amyloid beta-plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Inflammation including microglial activation may contribute in AD pathogenesis, and biomarkers for this process may thus be of value to study AD pathogenesis and might facilitate development of therapies targeting these cells. We therefore examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in patients with AD, other dementias, mild cognitive impairment and in healthy controls. Samples were analyzed for markers with known association to macrophage activity, including chitotriosidase, YKL-40 (CHI3L1, HC gp-39) and chemokine CC motif ligand 2 (CCL2, MCP1). Patients with AD had higher... (More)
Activated microglial cells, which are the resident macrophages of the central nervous system, surround amyloid beta-plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Inflammation including microglial activation may contribute in AD pathogenesis, and biomarkers for this process may thus be of value to study AD pathogenesis and might facilitate development of therapies targeting these cells. We therefore examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in patients with AD, other dementias, mild cognitive impairment and in healthy controls. Samples were analyzed for markers with known association to macrophage activity, including chitotriosidase, YKL-40 (CHI3L1, HC gp-39) and chemokine CC motif ligand 2 (CCL2, MCP1). Patients with AD had higher chitotriosidase activity than controls and patients with stable mild cognitive impairment, consistent with the presence of activated microglial cells in AD brains, but with large overlaps between groups. CCL2 and YKL-40 concentrations did not differ among groups. Microglial markers are unlikely to be useful for AD diagnosis, but might be useful for identification of distinct subgroups of patients, and for the development and implementation of drugs targeting microglial pathology. (Less)
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published
subject
keywords
Alzheimer's disease, Cerebrospinal fluid, Biomarker, Microglia, Cytokine, Chitotriosidase, YKL-40, CCL2
in
NeuroMolecular Medicine
volume
13
issue
2
pages
151 - 159
publisher
Humana Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000291258000005
  • scopus:80051547200
ISSN
1535-1084
DOI
10.1007/s12017-011-8147-9
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6599af1d-932d-49f5-b5e3-7a12cc1b911f (old id 1985256)
date added to LUP
2011-07-01 09:04:37
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:22:21
@article{6599af1d-932d-49f5-b5e3-7a12cc1b911f,
  abstract     = {Activated microglial cells, which are the resident macrophages of the central nervous system, surround amyloid beta-plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Inflammation including microglial activation may contribute in AD pathogenesis, and biomarkers for this process may thus be of value to study AD pathogenesis and might facilitate development of therapies targeting these cells. We therefore examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in patients with AD, other dementias, mild cognitive impairment and in healthy controls. Samples were analyzed for markers with known association to macrophage activity, including chitotriosidase, YKL-40 (CHI3L1, HC gp-39) and chemokine CC motif ligand 2 (CCL2, MCP1). Patients with AD had higher chitotriosidase activity than controls and patients with stable mild cognitive impairment, consistent with the presence of activated microglial cells in AD brains, but with large overlaps between groups. CCL2 and YKL-40 concentrations did not differ among groups. Microglial markers are unlikely to be useful for AD diagnosis, but might be useful for identification of distinct subgroups of patients, and for the development and implementation of drugs targeting microglial pathology.},
  author       = {Mattsson, Niklas and Tabatabaei, Shahrzad and Johansson, Per and Hansson, Oskar and Andreasson, Ulf and Mansson, Jan-Eric and Johansson, Jan-Ove and Olsson, Bob and Wallin, Anders and Svensson, Johan and Blennow, Kaj and Zetterberg, Henrik},
  issn         = {1535-1084},
  keyword      = {Alzheimer's disease,Cerebrospinal fluid,Biomarker,Microglia,Cytokine,Chitotriosidase,YKL-40,CCL2},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {151--159},
  publisher    = {Humana Press},
  series       = {NeuroMolecular Medicine},
  title        = {Cerebrospinal Fluid Microglial Markers in Alzheimer's Disease: Elevated Chitotriosidase Activity but Lack of Diagnostic Utility},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12017-011-8147-9},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2011},
}