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Effects of Inflow and Radiofrequency Spoiling on the Arterial Input Function in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Combined Phantom and Simulation Study

Garpebring, Anders; Wirestam, Ronnie LU ; Ostlund, Nils and Karlsson, Mikael (2011) In Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 65(6). p.1670-1679
Abstract
The arterial input function is crucial in pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data. Among other artifacts in arterial input function quantification, the blood inflow effect and nonideal radiofrequency spoiling can induce large measurement errors with subsequent reduction of accuracy in the pharmacokinetic parameters. These errors were investigated for a 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence using a pulsatile flow phantom and a total of 144 typical imaging settings. In the presence of large inflow effects, results showed poor average accuracy and large spread between imaging settings, when the standard spoiled gradient-echo signal equation was used in the analysis. For example, one of the investigated inflow conditions... (More)
The arterial input function is crucial in pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data. Among other artifacts in arterial input function quantification, the blood inflow effect and nonideal radiofrequency spoiling can induce large measurement errors with subsequent reduction of accuracy in the pharmacokinetic parameters. These errors were investigated for a 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence using a pulsatile flow phantom and a total of 144 typical imaging settings. In the presence of large inflow effects, results showed poor average accuracy and large spread between imaging settings, when the standard spoiled gradient-echo signal equation was used in the analysis. For example, one of the investigated inflow conditions resulted in a mean error of about 40% and a spread, given by the coefficient of variation, of 20% for K-trans. Minimizing inflow effects by appropriate slice placement, combined with compensation for nonideal radiofrequency spoiling, significantly improved the results, but they remained poorer than without flow (e. g., 3-4 times larger coefficient of variation for K-trans). It was concluded that the 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence is not optimal for accurate arterial input function quantification and that correction for nonideal radiofrequency spoiling in combination with inflow minimizing slice placement should be used to reduce the errors. Magn Reson Med 65:1670-1679, 2011. (C)2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, arterial input function, blood flow, effects, RF spoiling
in
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
volume
65
issue
6
pages
1670 - 1679
publisher
Wiley Online Library
external identifiers
  • wos:000291115500017
  • scopus:79958266746
ISSN
1522-2594
DOI
10.1002/mrm.22760
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6f1c652d-fc0f-46f8-842b-b43c223d6605 (old id 1985284)
date added to LUP
2011-07-01 09:06:13
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:09:43
@article{6f1c652d-fc0f-46f8-842b-b43c223d6605,
  abstract     = {The arterial input function is crucial in pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data. Among other artifacts in arterial input function quantification, the blood inflow effect and nonideal radiofrequency spoiling can induce large measurement errors with subsequent reduction of accuracy in the pharmacokinetic parameters. These errors were investigated for a 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence using a pulsatile flow phantom and a total of 144 typical imaging settings. In the presence of large inflow effects, results showed poor average accuracy and large spread between imaging settings, when the standard spoiled gradient-echo signal equation was used in the analysis. For example, one of the investigated inflow conditions resulted in a mean error of about 40% and a spread, given by the coefficient of variation, of 20% for K-trans. Minimizing inflow effects by appropriate slice placement, combined with compensation for nonideal radiofrequency spoiling, significantly improved the results, but they remained poorer than without flow (e. g., 3-4 times larger coefficient of variation for K-trans). It was concluded that the 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence is not optimal for accurate arterial input function quantification and that correction for nonideal radiofrequency spoiling in combination with inflow minimizing slice placement should be used to reduce the errors. Magn Reson Med 65:1670-1679, 2011. (C)2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.},
  author       = {Garpebring, Anders and Wirestam, Ronnie and Ostlund, Nils and Karlsson, Mikael},
  issn         = {1522-2594},
  keyword      = {dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI,arterial input function,blood flow,effects,RF spoiling},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1670--1679},
  publisher    = {Wiley Online Library},
  series       = {Magnetic Resonance in Medicine},
  title        = {Effects of Inflow and Radiofrequency Spoiling on the Arterial Input Function in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Combined Phantom and Simulation Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mrm.22760},
  volume       = {65},
  year         = {2011},
}