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Evaluation of a photosynthesis-based biogenic isoprene emission scheme in JULES and simulation of isoprene emissions under present-day climate conditions

Pacifico, F.; Harrison, S. P.; Jones, C. D.; Arneth, Almut LU ; Sitch, S.; Weedon, G. P.; Barkley, M. P.; Palmer, P. I.; Serca, D. and Potosnak, M., et al. (2011) In Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 11(9). p.4371-4389
Abstract
We have incorporated a semi-mechanistic isoprene emission module into the JULES land-surface scheme, as a first step towards a modelling tool that can be applied for studies of vegetation - atmospheric chemistry interactions, including chemistry-climate feedbacks. Here, we evaluate the coupled model against local above-canopy isoprene emission flux measurements from six flux tower sites as well as satellite-derived estimates of isoprene emission over tropical South America and east and south Asia. The model simulates diurnal variability well: correlation coefficients are significant (at the 95% level) for all flux tower sites. The model reproduces day-to-day variability with significant correlations (at the 95% confidence level) at four of... (More)
We have incorporated a semi-mechanistic isoprene emission module into the JULES land-surface scheme, as a first step towards a modelling tool that can be applied for studies of vegetation - atmospheric chemistry interactions, including chemistry-climate feedbacks. Here, we evaluate the coupled model against local above-canopy isoprene emission flux measurements from six flux tower sites as well as satellite-derived estimates of isoprene emission over tropical South America and east and south Asia. The model simulates diurnal variability well: correlation coefficients are significant (at the 95% level) for all flux tower sites. The model reproduces day-to-day variability with significant correlations (at the 95% confidence level) at four of the six flux tower sites. At the UMBS site, a complete set of seasonal observations is available for two years (2000 and 2002). The model reproduces the seasonal pattern of emission during 2002, but does less well in the year 2000. The model overestimates observed emissions at all sites, which is partially because it does not include isoprene loss through the canopy. Comparison with the satellite-derived isoprene-emission estimates suggests that the model simulates the main spatial patterns, seasonal and inter-annual variability over tropical regions. The model yields a global annual isoprene emission of 535 +/- 9 TgC yr(-1) during the 1990s, 78% of which from forested areas. (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
volume
11
issue
9
pages
4371 - 4389
publisher
Copernicus Gesellschaft Mbh
external identifiers
  • wos:000290618600024
  • scopus:79955915326
ISSN
1680-7324
DOI
10.5194/acp-11-4371-2011
project
MERGE
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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abfe3150-cae6-4fe7-beb6-9f6ae9a99feb (old id 1986530)
date added to LUP
2011-06-29 11:23:25
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:15:05
@article{abfe3150-cae6-4fe7-beb6-9f6ae9a99feb,
  abstract     = {We have incorporated a semi-mechanistic isoprene emission module into the JULES land-surface scheme, as a first step towards a modelling tool that can be applied for studies of vegetation - atmospheric chemistry interactions, including chemistry-climate feedbacks. Here, we evaluate the coupled model against local above-canopy isoprene emission flux measurements from six flux tower sites as well as satellite-derived estimates of isoprene emission over tropical South America and east and south Asia. The model simulates diurnal variability well: correlation coefficients are significant (at the 95% level) for all flux tower sites. The model reproduces day-to-day variability with significant correlations (at the 95% confidence level) at four of the six flux tower sites. At the UMBS site, a complete set of seasonal observations is available for two years (2000 and 2002). The model reproduces the seasonal pattern of emission during 2002, but does less well in the year 2000. The model overestimates observed emissions at all sites, which is partially because it does not include isoprene loss through the canopy. Comparison with the satellite-derived isoprene-emission estimates suggests that the model simulates the main spatial patterns, seasonal and inter-annual variability over tropical regions. The model yields a global annual isoprene emission of 535 +/- 9 TgC yr(-1) during the 1990s, 78% of which from forested areas.},
  author       = {Pacifico, F. and Harrison, S. P. and Jones, C. D. and Arneth, Almut and Sitch, S. and Weedon, G. P. and Barkley, M. P. and Palmer, P. I. and Serca, D. and Potosnak, M. and Fu, T. -M. and Goldstein, A. and Bai, J. and Schurgers, Guy},
  issn         = {1680-7324},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {4371--4389},
  publisher    = {Copernicus Gesellschaft Mbh},
  series       = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics},
  title        = {Evaluation of a photosynthesis-based biogenic isoprene emission scheme in JULES and simulation of isoprene emissions under present-day climate conditions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/acp-11-4371-2011},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2011},
}