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High precompetition injury rate dominates the injury profile at the Rio 2016 Summer Paralympic Games : a prospective cohort study of 51 198 athlete days

Derman, Wayne; Runciman, Phoebe; Schwellnus, Martin; Jordaan, Esme; Blauwet, Cheri; Webborn, Nick; Lexell, Jan LU ; van de Vliet, Peter; Tuakli-Wosornu, Yetsa and Kissick, James, et al. (2018) In British journal of sports medicine 52(1). p.24-31
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To describe the incidence of injury in the precompetition and competition periods of the Rio 2016 Summer Paralympic Games.

METHODS: A total of 3657 athletes from 78 countries, representing 83.4% of all athletes at the Games, were monitored on the web-based injury and illness surveillance system over 51 198 athlete days during the Rio 2016 Summer Paralympic Games. Injury data were obtained daily from teams with their own medical support.

RESULTS: A total of 510 injuries were reported during the 14-day Games period, with an injury incidence rate (IR) of 10.0 injuries per 1000 athlete days (12.1% of all athletes surveyed). The highest IRs were reported for football 5-a-side (22.5), judo (15.5) and football 7-a-side... (More)

OBJECTIVES: To describe the incidence of injury in the precompetition and competition periods of the Rio 2016 Summer Paralympic Games.

METHODS: A total of 3657 athletes from 78 countries, representing 83.4% of all athletes at the Games, were monitored on the web-based injury and illness surveillance system over 51 198 athlete days during the Rio 2016 Summer Paralympic Games. Injury data were obtained daily from teams with their own medical support.

RESULTS: A total of 510 injuries were reported during the 14-day Games period, with an injury incidence rate (IR) of 10.0 injuries per 1000 athlete days (12.1% of all athletes surveyed). The highest IRs were reported for football 5-a-side (22.5), judo (15.5) and football 7-a-side (15.3) compared with other sports (p<0.05). Precompetition injuries were significantly higher than in the competition period (risk ratio: 1.40, p<0.05), and acute traumatic injuries were the most common injuries at the Games (IR of 5.5). The shoulder was the most common anatomical area affected by injury (IR of 1.8).

CONCLUSION: The data from this study indicate that (1) IRs were lower than those reported for the London 2012 Summer Paralympic Games, (2) the sports of football 5-a-side, judo and football 7-a-side were independent risk factors for injury, (3) precompetition injuries had a higher IR than competition period injuries, (4) injuries to the shoulder were the most common. These results would allow for comparative data to be collected at future editions of the Games and can be used to inform injury prevention programmes.

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organization
publishing date
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
athlete, disability, epidemiology, injury, sporting injuries
in
British journal of sports medicine
volume
52
issue
1
pages
8 pages
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:85040526236
ISSN
1473-0480
DOI
10.1136/bjsports-2017-098039
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1ad33c54-0bb3-4092-94e5-705f6fcf73d1
date added to LUP
2018-02-05 14:56:15
date last changed
2018-02-06 15:02:40
@article{1ad33c54-0bb3-4092-94e5-705f6fcf73d1,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVES: To describe the incidence of injury in the precompetition and competition periods of the Rio 2016 Summer Paralympic Games.</p><p>METHODS: A total of 3657 athletes from 78 countries, representing 83.4% of all athletes at the Games, were monitored on the web-based injury and illness surveillance system over 51 198 athlete days during the Rio 2016 Summer Paralympic Games. Injury data were obtained daily from teams with their own medical support.</p><p>RESULTS: A total of 510 injuries were reported during the 14-day Games period, with an injury incidence rate (IR) of 10.0 injuries per 1000 athlete days (12.1% of all athletes surveyed). The highest IRs were reported for football 5-a-side (22.5), judo (15.5) and football 7-a-side (15.3) compared with other sports (p&lt;0.05). Precompetition injuries were significantly higher than in the competition period (risk ratio: 1.40, p&lt;0.05), and acute traumatic injuries were the most common injuries at the Games (IR of 5.5). The shoulder was the most common anatomical area affected by injury (IR of 1.8).</p><p>CONCLUSION: The data from this study indicate that (1) IRs were lower than those reported for the London 2012 Summer Paralympic Games, (2) the sports of football 5-a-side, judo and football 7-a-side were independent risk factors for injury, (3) precompetition injuries had a higher IR than competition period injuries, (4) injuries to the shoulder were the most common. These results would allow for comparative data to be collected at future editions of the Games and can be used to inform injury prevention programmes.</p>},
  author       = {Derman, Wayne and Runciman, Phoebe and Schwellnus, Martin and Jordaan, Esme and Blauwet, Cheri and Webborn, Nick and Lexell, Jan and van de Vliet, Peter and Tuakli-Wosornu, Yetsa and Kissick, James and Stomphorst, Jaap},
  issn         = {1473-0480},
  keyword      = {athlete,disability,epidemiology,injury,sporting injuries},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {24--31},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {British journal of sports medicine},
  title        = {High precompetition injury rate dominates the injury profile at the Rio 2016 Summer Paralympic Games : a prospective cohort study of 51 198 athlete days},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2017-098039},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {2018},
}