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Hand eczema and occupational contact allergies in healthcare workers with a focus on rubber additives

Hamnerius, Nils LU ; Svedman, Cecilia LU ; Bergendorff, Ola LU ; Björk, Jonas LU ; Bruze, Magnus LU ; Engfeldt, Malin LU and Pontén, Ann LU (2018) In Contact Dermatitis 79(3). p.149-156
Abstract

Background: Hand eczema (HE) in healthcare workers (HCWs) is common. Besides wet work, healthcare work also implies exposure to contact allergens. Objectives: To assess HE and contact allergy related to occupational exposures in HCWs. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 311 HCWs with HE within the preceding 12 months and a control group of 114 HCWs without HE were investigated with the baseline series and a special patch test series based on substances found in the gloves, soaps, alcoholic hand disinfectants and hand creams provided at the hospitals. Results: Contact allergy to rubber additives was significantly more common in HCWs with HE (6%) than in HCWs without HE (1%, P =.02). The corresponding percentages for fragrances were 11%... (More)

Background: Hand eczema (HE) in healthcare workers (HCWs) is common. Besides wet work, healthcare work also implies exposure to contact allergens. Objectives: To assess HE and contact allergy related to occupational exposures in HCWs. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 311 HCWs with HE within the preceding 12 months and a control group of 114 HCWs without HE were investigated with the baseline series and a special patch test series based on substances found in the gloves, soaps, alcoholic hand disinfectants and hand creams provided at the hospitals. Results: Contact allergy to rubber additives was significantly more common in HCWs with HE (6%) than in HCWs without HE (1%, P =.02). The corresponding percentages for fragrances were 11% and 3%, respectively (P =.004). Occupational HE was found in 193 of 311 (62%) HCWs. Of these, 22 of 193 (11%) had occupational allergic contact dermatitis, including 17 with glove-related rubber contact allergy. Contact allergy to diphenylguanidine was as common as contact allergy to thiurams. Occupational contact allergy to rubber additives was significantly associated with sick-leave related to HE. Conclusion: Contact allergy to rubber additives in medical gloves is the most common cause of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in HCWs. Aimed patch testing with relevant rubber additives is mandatory when HE in HCWs is investigated.

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author
; ; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
contact allergy, diphenylguanidine, hand eczema, healthcare worker, patch test, rubber additive
in
Contact Dermatitis
volume
79
issue
3
pages
8 pages
publisher
Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85051771380
  • pmid:29923205
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/cod.13042
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1b7d4ae6-168c-4605-833d-bb58b2262b08
date added to LUP
2018-09-07 11:08:37
date last changed
2021-10-06 02:44:08
@article{1b7d4ae6-168c-4605-833d-bb58b2262b08,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Hand eczema (HE) in healthcare workers (HCWs) is common. Besides wet work, healthcare work also implies exposure to contact allergens. Objectives: To assess HE and contact allergy related to occupational exposures in HCWs. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 311 HCWs with HE within the preceding 12 months and a control group of 114 HCWs without HE were investigated with the baseline series and a special patch test series based on substances found in the gloves, soaps, alcoholic hand disinfectants and hand creams provided at the hospitals. Results: Contact allergy to rubber additives was significantly more common in HCWs with HE (6%) than in HCWs without HE (1%, P =.02). The corresponding percentages for fragrances were 11% and 3%, respectively (P =.004). Occupational HE was found in 193 of 311 (62%) HCWs. Of these, 22 of 193 (11%) had occupational allergic contact dermatitis, including 17 with glove-related rubber contact allergy. Contact allergy to diphenylguanidine was as common as contact allergy to thiurams. Occupational contact allergy to rubber additives was significantly associated with sick-leave related to HE. Conclusion: Contact allergy to rubber additives in medical gloves is the most common cause of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in HCWs. Aimed patch testing with relevant rubber additives is mandatory when HE in HCWs is investigated.</p>},
  author       = {Hamnerius, Nils and Svedman, Cecilia and Bergendorff, Ola and Björk, Jonas and Bruze, Magnus and Engfeldt, Malin and Pontén, Ann},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {149--156},
  publisher    = {Blackwell},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {Hand eczema and occupational contact allergies in healthcare workers with a focus on rubber additives},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.13042},
  doi          = {10.1111/cod.13042},
  volume       = {79},
  year         = {2018},
}