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Detecting longitudinal changes in activities of daily living (ADL) dependence : Optimizing ADL staircase response choices

Axmon, Anna LU ; Ekstam, Lisa LU ; Slaug, Björn LU ; Schmidt, Steven M. LU and Fänge, Agneta Malmgren LU (2019) In British Journal of Occupational Therapy
Abstract

Introduction: Using a sum score based on a three-graded response scale for the activities of daily living staircase has previously been found to increase the statistical power compared to dichotomized responses when assessing longitudinal changes in activities of daily living. We aimed to investigate if the statistical power could be further increased by using a four-graded scale. Methods: We used data from two previous studies on community-living people to calculate sum scores based on a dichotomized (independent/dependent), a three-graded (independent/partly dependent/dependent), and a four-graded (independent without difficulty/independent with difficulty/partly dependent/dependent) response scale for the activities of daily living... (More)

Introduction: Using a sum score based on a three-graded response scale for the activities of daily living staircase has previously been found to increase the statistical power compared to dichotomized responses when assessing longitudinal changes in activities of daily living. We aimed to investigate if the statistical power could be further increased by using a four-graded scale. Methods: We used data from two previous studies on community-living people to calculate sum scores based on a dichotomized (independent/dependent), a three-graded (independent/partly dependent/dependent), and a four-graded (independent without difficulty/independent with difficulty/partly dependent/dependent) response scale for the activities of daily living staircase. In total, 1818 paired observations (baseline to follow-up) from 482 people were included. Statistical power was estimated for the entire material as well as stratified by follow-up time and baseline activities of daily living using simulations. Results: The four-graded scale provided the highest statistical power, particularly for shorter follow-up times and low and high baseline activities of daily living, but had similar statistical power to the three-graded scale for longer follow-up times and medium baseline activities of daily living. Conclusion: Adding a second level to “independent” in the activities of daily living staircase improved the detection of changes over time.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Activities of daily living, data interpretation, occupational therapy, statistical longitudinal studies
in
British Journal of Occupational Therapy
publisher
College of Occupational Therapists
external identifiers
  • scopus:85067842342
ISSN
0308-0226
DOI
10.1177/0308022619853513
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1bf2ea59-b1ba-4c9c-86e7-00ec665cb11f
date added to LUP
2019-07-08 13:30:00
date last changed
2019-07-30 05:06:25
@article{1bf2ea59-b1ba-4c9c-86e7-00ec665cb11f,
  abstract     = {<p>Introduction: Using a sum score based on a three-graded response scale for the activities of daily living staircase has previously been found to increase the statistical power compared to dichotomized responses when assessing longitudinal changes in activities of daily living. We aimed to investigate if the statistical power could be further increased by using a four-graded scale. Methods: We used data from two previous studies on community-living people to calculate sum scores based on a dichotomized (independent/dependent), a three-graded (independent/partly dependent/dependent), and a four-graded (independent without difficulty/independent with difficulty/partly dependent/dependent) response scale for the activities of daily living staircase. In total, 1818 paired observations (baseline to follow-up) from 482 people were included. Statistical power was estimated for the entire material as well as stratified by follow-up time and baseline activities of daily living using simulations. Results: The four-graded scale provided the highest statistical power, particularly for shorter follow-up times and low and high baseline activities of daily living, but had similar statistical power to the three-graded scale for longer follow-up times and medium baseline activities of daily living. Conclusion: Adding a second level to “independent” in the activities of daily living staircase improved the detection of changes over time.</p>},
  author       = {Axmon, Anna and Ekstam, Lisa and Slaug, Björn and Schmidt, Steven M. and Fänge, Agneta Malmgren},
  issn         = {0308-0226},
  keyword      = {Activities of daily living,data interpretation,occupational therapy,statistical longitudinal studies},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {College of Occupational Therapists},
  series       = {British Journal of Occupational Therapy},
  title        = {Detecting longitudinal changes in activities of daily living (ADL) dependence : Optimizing ADL staircase response choices},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0308022619853513},
  year         = {2019},
}