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Avian influenza surveillance : On the usability of FTA®cards to solve biosafety and transport issues

Kraus, Robert H S; van Hooft, Pim; Waldenström, Jonas LU ; Latorre-Margalef, Neus LU ; Ydenberg, Ronald C and Prins, Herbert H T (2009) In Wildfowl p.215-223
Abstract

Many zoonotic diseases have birds as their natural hosts. Waterfowl are the natural hosts of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) and most avian influenza infections of wild birds appear mild, with infected inviduals displaying no or few symptoms. It is clear that the epidemiology of avian influenza cannot be fully understood without taking the ecology of its hosts into account. However, large scale studies and surveillance are still hampered by issues about preservation, transport and storage of AIVs, including bio-safety regulations and maintaining samples. This complicates the possibilities of the many small projects across the world if they are not done within the framework of one of the few big projects. Here, evidence is provided of the... (More)

Many zoonotic diseases have birds as their natural hosts. Waterfowl are the natural hosts of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) and most avian influenza infections of wild birds appear mild, with infected inviduals displaying no or few symptoms. It is clear that the epidemiology of avian influenza cannot be fully understood without taking the ecology of its hosts into account. However, large scale studies and surveillance are still hampered by issues about preservation, transport and storage of AIVs, including bio-safety regulations and maintaining samples. This complicates the possibilities of the many small projects across the world if they are not done within the framework of one of the few big projects. Here, evidence is provided of the potential for using Whatman FTA®cards as a new preservation method to solve the above mentioned issues. Its efficiency is comparable to that of a standard method in virology, and saves time and money. In both large scale AIV sampling and small scale independent projects this method might be the means by which the field of the AIV ecology will be lifted beyond the constraints of difficult and expensive sampling, storage and laboratory facilities.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Avian influenza sampling, Avian influenza virus, Fta card, Management, Viral rna
in
Wildfowl
issue
SPECIAL ISSUE 2
pages
9 pages
publisher
Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust
external identifiers
  • scopus:77249095226
ISSN
0954-6324
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
1bff3d7c-5ff7-4c1e-8a74-4b7312aee409
alternative location
http://wildfowl.wwt.org.uk/index.php/wildfowl/article/download/1356/pdf_84
date added to LUP
2017-04-11 14:07:44
date last changed
2017-05-09 11:37:14
@article{1bff3d7c-5ff7-4c1e-8a74-4b7312aee409,
  abstract     = {<p>Many zoonotic diseases have birds as their natural hosts. Waterfowl are the natural hosts of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) and most avian influenza infections of wild birds appear mild, with infected inviduals displaying no or few symptoms. It is clear that the epidemiology of avian influenza cannot be fully understood without taking the ecology of its hosts into account. However, large scale studies and surveillance are still hampered by issues about preservation, transport and storage of AIVs, including bio-safety regulations and maintaining samples. This complicates the possibilities of the many small projects across the world if they are not done within the framework of one of the few big projects. Here, evidence is provided of the potential for using Whatman FTA®cards as a new preservation method to solve the above mentioned issues. Its efficiency is comparable to that of a standard method in virology, and saves time and money. In both large scale AIV sampling and small scale independent projects this method might be the means by which the field of the AIV ecology will be lifted beyond the constraints of difficult and expensive sampling, storage and laboratory facilities.</p>},
  author       = {Kraus, Robert H S and van Hooft, Pim and Waldenström, Jonas and Latorre-Margalef, Neus and Ydenberg, Ronald C and Prins, Herbert H T},
  issn         = {0954-6324},
  keyword      = {Avian influenza sampling,Avian influenza virus,Fta card,Management,Viral rna},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {SPECIAL ISSUE 2},
  pages        = {215--223},
  publisher    = {Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust},
  series       = {Wildfowl},
  title        = {Avian influenza surveillance : On the usability of FTA®cards to solve biosafety and transport issues},
  year         = {2009},
}