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Sex differences in asthma in swimmers and tennis players

Romberg, Kerstin LU ; Tufvesson, Ellen LU and Bjermer, Leif LU (2017) In Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology 118(3). p.311-317
Abstract

Background: Elite athletes, independent of sport, have increased risk of developing asthma, but little is known about sex difference among adolescent athletes. Objective: To investigate and compare sex-related differences according to symptoms and treatment of asthma, allergy, and health among elite athletes and a reference group. Methods: Adolescent elite swimmers (n = 101), tennis players (n = 86), and a reference group (n = 1,628) responded to a questionnaire about respiratory symptoms, allergy, health behavior, psychosomatic symptoms, self- esteem, and well-being. The athletes performed a mannitol provocation and a sport-specific exercise provocation. Atopy was assessed by skin prick tests, and fractional exhaled nitric oxide was... (More)

Background: Elite athletes, independent of sport, have increased risk of developing asthma, but little is known about sex difference among adolescent athletes. Objective: To investigate and compare sex-related differences according to symptoms and treatment of asthma, allergy, and health among elite athletes and a reference group. Methods: Adolescent elite swimmers (n = 101), tennis players (n = 86), and a reference group (n = 1,628) responded to a questionnaire about respiratory symptoms, allergy, health behavior, psychosomatic symptoms, self- esteem, and well-being. The athletes performed a mannitol provocation and a sport-specific exercise provocation. Atopy was assessed by skin prick tests, and fractional exhaled nitric oxide was measured. Results: The females reported more asthma symptoms than the males in both the reference group (29.1% vs 22.3%) and the athlete group (56.4% vs 40.2%). However, no significant differences were found in physician-diagnosed asthma or treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. More female athletes had a positive mannitol provocation result (48.7% vs 35.8% in male athletes), and more female swimmers had a positive exercise provocation result (15.1% vs 7.7% in male swimmers). The females in all groups had more psychosomatic symptoms compared with the respective males, and the males in the reference group reported higher self-esteem and felt more well-being compared with the reference group females. Conclusion: Overall, we found a higher prevalence of asthma symptoms in the females. However, the frequency of physician-diagnosed asthma and the prescription of inhaled corticosteroids were the same in both sexes. This finding demonstrates an insufficient diagnosis of asthma in females.

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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
volume
118
issue
3
pages
311 - 317
publisher
American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
external identifiers
  • scopus:85009960918
  • wos:000398935500014
ISSN
1081-1206
DOI
10.1016/j.anai.2016.12.013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1c5456ac-8957-4815-9e2c-e1dfbad361cc
date added to LUP
2017-02-06 11:23:53
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:48:42
@article{1c5456ac-8957-4815-9e2c-e1dfbad361cc,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Elite athletes, independent of sport, have increased risk of developing asthma, but little is known about sex difference among adolescent athletes. Objective: To investigate and compare sex-related differences according to symptoms and treatment of asthma, allergy, and health among elite athletes and a reference group. Methods: Adolescent elite swimmers (n = 101), tennis players (n = 86), and a reference group (n = 1,628) responded to a questionnaire about respiratory symptoms, allergy, health behavior, psychosomatic symptoms, self- esteem, and well-being. The athletes performed a mannitol provocation and a sport-specific exercise provocation. Atopy was assessed by skin prick tests, and fractional exhaled nitric oxide was measured. Results: The females reported more asthma symptoms than the males in both the reference group (29.1% vs 22.3%) and the athlete group (56.4% vs 40.2%). However, no significant differences were found in physician-diagnosed asthma or treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. More female athletes had a positive mannitol provocation result (48.7% vs 35.8% in male athletes), and more female swimmers had a positive exercise provocation result (15.1% vs 7.7% in male swimmers). The females in all groups had more psychosomatic symptoms compared with the respective males, and the males in the reference group reported higher self-esteem and felt more well-being compared with the reference group females. Conclusion: Overall, we found a higher prevalence of asthma symptoms in the females. However, the frequency of physician-diagnosed asthma and the prescription of inhaled corticosteroids were the same in both sexes. This finding demonstrates an insufficient diagnosis of asthma in females.</p>},
  author       = {Romberg, Kerstin and Tufvesson, Ellen and Bjermer, Leif},
  issn         = {1081-1206},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {311--317},
  publisher    = {American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology},
  series       = {Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology},
  title        = {Sex differences in asthma in swimmers and tennis players},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2016.12.013},
  volume       = {118},
  year         = {2017},
}