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N,N-dimethylacrylamide—A new sensitizer in the FreeStyle Libre glucose sensor

Mowitz, Martin LU ; Herman, Anne ; Baeck, Marie ; Isaksson, Marléne LU ; Antelmi, Annarita LU ; Hamnerius, Nils LU ; Pontén, Ann LU and Bruze, Magnus LU (2019) In Contact Dermatitis 81(1). p.27-31
Abstract

Background: Isobornyl acrylate (IBOA) has recently been identified as one sensitizer in the FreeStyle Libre glucose sensor. Analyses with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have indicated the presence of N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAA) in the sensor. Material and methods: Seven patients were referred for patch testing after developing skin reactions when using FreeStyle Libre. All patients were patch tested with IBOA and DMAA. Two patients were tested with adhesive patches that had been removed from the sensors “as is,” and two patients were tested with acetone extracts of materials from the sensor. The extracts were analysed with GC-MS. Results: Six patients reacted to both IBOA and DMAA, and one patient reacted only to DMAA.... (More)

Background: Isobornyl acrylate (IBOA) has recently been identified as one sensitizer in the FreeStyle Libre glucose sensor. Analyses with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have indicated the presence of N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAA) in the sensor. Material and methods: Seven patients were referred for patch testing after developing skin reactions when using FreeStyle Libre. All patients were patch tested with IBOA and DMAA. Two patients were tested with adhesive patches that had been removed from the sensors “as is,” and two patients were tested with acetone extracts of materials from the sensor. The extracts were analysed with GC-MS. Results: Six patients reacted to both IBOA and DMAA, and one patient reacted only to DMAA. Positive reactions were also observed in both patients tested with the adhesive patch "as is". One patient reacted to both an extract of the adhesive patch and an extract of the sensor itself. When analysed with GC-MS, IBOA was found in both extracts and DMAA was found in the extract of the sensor. Conclusion: Both IBOA and DMAA may be present in adhesives used in medical devices such as glucose sensors or insulin pumps, and should be patch tested when suspected contact allergic reactions to these products are investigated.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
adhesive, allergic contact dermatitis, diabetes mellitus, FreeStyle Libre, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, glucose sensor, isobornyl acrylate, medical device, N,N-dimethylacrylamide
in
Contact Dermatitis
volume
81
issue
1
pages
5 pages
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85063615847
  • pmid:30773644
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/cod.13243
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1eddd8ec-aa3f-4d49-859b-ece2e635f150
date added to LUP
2019-04-10 13:21:31
date last changed
2020-01-16 03:50:50
@article{1eddd8ec-aa3f-4d49-859b-ece2e635f150,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Isobornyl acrylate (IBOA) has recently been identified as one sensitizer in the FreeStyle Libre glucose sensor. Analyses with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have indicated the presence of N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAA) in the sensor. Material and methods: Seven patients were referred for patch testing after developing skin reactions when using FreeStyle Libre. All patients were patch tested with IBOA and DMAA. Two patients were tested with adhesive patches that had been removed from the sensors “as is,” and two patients were tested with acetone extracts of materials from the sensor. The extracts were analysed with GC-MS. Results: Six patients reacted to both IBOA and DMAA, and one patient reacted only to DMAA. Positive reactions were also observed in both patients tested with the adhesive patch "as is". One patient reacted to both an extract of the adhesive patch and an extract of the sensor itself. When analysed with GC-MS, IBOA was found in both extracts and DMAA was found in the extract of the sensor. Conclusion: Both IBOA and DMAA may be present in adhesives used in medical devices such as glucose sensors or insulin pumps, and should be patch tested when suspected contact allergic reactions to these products are investigated.</p>},
  author       = {Mowitz, Martin and Herman, Anne and Baeck, Marie and Isaksson, Marléne and Antelmi, Annarita and Hamnerius, Nils and Pontén, Ann and Bruze, Magnus},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {27--31},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {N,N-dimethylacrylamide—A new sensitizer in the FreeStyle Libre glucose sensor},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.13243},
  doi          = {10.1111/cod.13243},
  volume       = {81},
  year         = {2019},
}