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Disturbed cervical proprioception affects perception of spatial orientation while in motion

Malmström, Eva Maj LU ; Fransson, Per Anders LU ; Jaxmar Bruinen, Terese; Facic, Semir and Tjernström, Fredrik LU (2017) In Experimental Brain Research 235(9). p.2755-2766
Abstract

The proprioceptive, visual and vestibular sensory systems interact to maintain dynamic stability during movement. The relative importance and interplay between these sensory systems is still not fully understood. Increased knowledge about spatial perception and postural orientation would provide better understanding of balance disorders, and their rehabilitation. Displacement of the body in space was recorded in 16 healthy subjects performing a sequence of stepping-in-place tests without any visual or auditory cues. Spatial displacement and orientation in space were determined by calculating two parameters, “Moved distance (sagittal + lateral displacement)” and “Rotation”. During the stepping-in-place tests vibration were applied in a... (More)

The proprioceptive, visual and vestibular sensory systems interact to maintain dynamic stability during movement. The relative importance and interplay between these sensory systems is still not fully understood. Increased knowledge about spatial perception and postural orientation would provide better understanding of balance disorders, and their rehabilitation. Displacement of the body in space was recorded in 16 healthy subjects performing a sequence of stepping-in-place tests without any visual or auditory cues. Spatial displacement and orientation in space were determined by calculating two parameters, “Moved distance (sagittal + lateral displacement)” and “Rotation”. During the stepping-in-place tests vibration were applied in a randomized order on four different cervical muscles, and the effects were compared between muscles and to a non-vibration baseline condition. During the tests a forward displacement (“Moved distance”) was found to be the normal behavior, with various degrees of longitudinal rotation (“Rotation”). The moved distance was significantly larger when the vibration was applied on the dorsal muscles (916 mm) relative to on ventral muscles (715 mm) (p = 0.003) and the rate of displacement was significantly larger for dorsal muscles (36.5 mm/s) relative to ventral (28.7 mm/s) vs (p = 0.002). When vibration was applied on the left-sided muscles, 16° rotation to the right was induced (p = 0.005), whereas no significant rotation direction was induced with right-sided vibration (3°). The rate of rotation was significantly larger for vibration applied on ventral muscles (0.44°/s) relative to on dorsal (0.33°/s) (p = 0.019). The results highlight the influence of cervical proprioception on the internal spatial orientation, and subsequent for postural control.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Orientation, Position sense, Proprioception, Spatial perception
in
Experimental Brain Research
volume
235
issue
9
pages
12 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85020518630
ISSN
0014-4819
DOI
10.1007/s00221-017-4993-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1f932753-108e-4667-9064-eb975006a430
date added to LUP
2018-01-25 08:02:34
date last changed
2019-09-04 04:11:21
@article{1f932753-108e-4667-9064-eb975006a430,
  abstract     = {<p>The proprioceptive, visual and vestibular sensory systems interact to maintain dynamic stability during movement. The relative importance and interplay between these sensory systems is still not fully understood. Increased knowledge about spatial perception and postural orientation would provide better understanding of balance disorders, and their rehabilitation. Displacement of the body in space was recorded in 16 healthy subjects performing a sequence of stepping-in-place tests without any visual or auditory cues. Spatial displacement and orientation in space were determined by calculating two parameters, “Moved distance (sagittal + lateral displacement)” and “Rotation”. During the stepping-in-place tests vibration were applied in a randomized order on four different cervical muscles, and the effects were compared between muscles and to a non-vibration baseline condition. During the tests a forward displacement (“Moved distance”) was found to be the normal behavior, with various degrees of longitudinal rotation (“Rotation”). The moved distance was significantly larger when the vibration was applied on the dorsal muscles (916 mm) relative to on ventral muscles (715 mm) (p = 0.003) and the rate of displacement was significantly larger for dorsal muscles (36.5 mm/s) relative to ventral (28.7 mm/s) vs (p = 0.002). When vibration was applied on the left-sided muscles, 16° rotation to the right was induced (p = 0.005), whereas no significant rotation direction was induced with right-sided vibration (3°). The rate of rotation was significantly larger for vibration applied on ventral muscles (0.44°/s) relative to on dorsal (0.33°/s) (p = 0.019). The results highlight the influence of cervical proprioception on the internal spatial orientation, and subsequent for postural control.</p>},
  author       = {Malmström, Eva Maj and Fransson, Per Anders and Jaxmar Bruinen, Terese and Facic, Semir and Tjernström, Fredrik},
  issn         = {0014-4819},
  keyword      = {Orientation,Position sense,Proprioception,Spatial perception},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {2755--2766},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Experimental Brain Research},
  title        = {Disturbed cervical proprioception affects perception of spatial orientation while in motion},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-017-4993-5},
  volume       = {235},
  year         = {2017},
}